Latest News and Updates

April 3, 2017
Deadly Flooding Rains Near Mocoa, Colombia Measured By GPM IMERG
Click here to view animated GIF Late Friday night and Saturday morning flash flooding and mudslides killed over 250 people in Mocoa, Colombia. Extremely intense storms added heavy rain to water logged terrain around Mocoa. Water from this heavy rainfall converged into a river that runs close to Mocoa causing it to overflow it's banks with deadly results.  Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals (IMERG) data were used to estimate the amount of rain that fell near Mocoa, Colombia during the seven day period from March 26 to April 2, 2017. IMERG indicates that area rainfall totals during the week were frequently greater than 80 mm (3.1 inches). This analysis also shows the locations of heavy rainfall that extended from east of Mocoa into the high mountains that surround the city. Torrents of water rushed from the high terrain and were funneled into the valley where Mocoa is located. IMERG rainfall totals have been adjusted to reflect observed values in other similar extreme rainfall events.

 

April 1, 2017
Landslide susceptibility and fatalities map from the NASA Global Landslide Catalog.
Torrential rains on the night of Friday March 31st 2017 caused three rivers surrounding the southern Colombian city of Mocoa to overflow -- sending a torrent of mud and debris surging through the city. At least 254 people were killed.  The above image shows the Global Landslide Susceptibility map for the affected region, overlaid with the estimated total fatalities due to landslides from 2007-2016 on the left.  This data was generated as part of NASA's Global Landslide Catalog project. Learn more and view the full Global Landslide Susceptibility map here: https://pmm.nasa.gov/applications/global-landslide-model    This image shows the near-realtime Landslide Nowcast product for the Macao Columia region for 4/1/2017. View more landslide nowcasts and other near-realtime precipitation products using the NASA Precipitation and Applications Viewer: https://pmm.nasa.gov/precip-apps

 

April 4, 2017
Change detection map that highlights flood waters in Peru using Sentinel-1 data
The NASA SPoRT team provided change detection products that highlight recent flood waters in Peru using Sentinel-1 data. These products were developed in conjunction with colleagues at the Alaska Satellite Facility (https://www.asf.alaska.edu/). The change detection is a simple algorithm is based detecting change that is consistent with flooding using a pre- and post-event scene. The product’s final form is a binary geotiffs and a simple training guide was provided to end users.  Download GeoTIFF's and Training Materials Here: ftp://geo.nsstc.nasa.gov/SPoRT/disasters/2017_peru_flooding/

 

March 29, 2017
Animated 3D look at precipitation from tropical cyclone Debbie.
Tropical cyclone Debbie formed in the Coral Sea northeast of Australia om March 24, 2017. Debbie intensified and had hurricane force wind speeds within a day of formation. While headed toward northeastern Australia Debbie reached it's maximum sustained wind speeds estimated at over 100 kts (115 mph) on March 27, 2017 (UTC). Tropical cyclone Debbie came ashore on March 28th and brought destructive winds and extremely heavy rain to northeastern Australia. It was reported that heavy rainfall caused flash flooding that cut off a coastal town and covered several roads in Queensland.  The GPM satellite viewed Debbie several times during it's trek toward Australia. GPM flew over the tropical cyclone in the Coral Sea on March 24th shortly before it was assigned a name. With that pass GPM saw that the forming tropical cyclone was getting organized and contained bands of heavy rainfall south of the center of circulation. Debbie was close to hurricane intensity with bands of very heavy rain spiraling into the tropical cyclone when GPM passed over on March 25 at 1436 UTC. GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) showed a Debbie had an eye on March 26th. Intense bands of rain circling a well defined eye were revealed by GPM's GMI on March 27, 2017.  The GPM satellite flew above the center of intensifying tropical cyclone Debbie on March 25th. GPM's radar data (DPR ku Band) collected with that pass showed that many storm tops in feeder bands around the tropical cyclone were reaching heights above 13 km (8 miles). 

 

March 28, 2017
An inundation map of the region near Proserpine, Australia, produced using the Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS) on 3/28/17.
An inundation map of the region near Proserpine, Australia, produced using the Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS). The GFMS is a NASA-funded experimental system using real-time TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) precipitation information as input to a quasi-global hydrological runoff and routing model.

 

March 27, 2017
An inundation map of Piura province produced using the Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS) on 3/26/17.
An inundation map of Piura province produced using the Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS). The GFMS is a NASA-funded experimental system using real-time TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) precipitation information as input to a quasi-global hydrological runoff and routing model.

 

February 23, 2017
IMERG rainfall estimates for the period from Feb. 15 at 00:30 UTC (Feb. 14 at 7:30 p.m. EST) to Feb. 23 at 23:00 UTC (6 p.m. EST).
NASA has estimated rainfall from the Pineapple Express over the coastal regions southwestern Oregon and northern California from the series of storms in February, 2017. IMERG rainfall estimates for the period from Feb. 15 at 00:30 UTC (Feb. 14 at 7:30 p.m. EST) to Feb. 23 at 23:00 UTC (6 p.m. EST). The initial surge was responsible for bringing part of the rainfall (up to about 2 to 3 inches) was seen over the coastal regions southwestern Oregon and northern California.Credits: NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce The West Coast is once again feeling the effects of the "Pineapple Express." Back in early January one of these "atmospheric river" events, which taps into tropical moisture from as far away as the Hawaiian Islands, brought heavy rains from Washington state and Oregon all the way down to southern California. This second time around, many of those same areas were hit again. The current rains are a result of three separate surges of moisture impacting the West Coast. The first such surge in this current event began impacting the Pacific coastal regions of Washington, Oregon, and northern California on February 15.  Video of California Gets Slammed Again  

 

February 9, 2017
The interactive map on the website shows images of areas with fires or floods, taken by NASA's AQUA satellite and the International Space Station (ISS).
Visit the interactive map website: http://science.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapSeries/index.html?appid=9ef5b5839... The interactive map on the website shows images of areas with fires or floods, taken by NASA's AQUA satellite and the International Space Station (ISS). The United States and Argentina have combined resources to produce a Spanish language website sharing satellite imagery and videos of the recent wildfires in Argentina. The project is a joint effort between Argentina, NASA, the US Department of State and ESRI.  CONAE, who uses NASA’s algorithms and data, was the lead satellite organization responding to this disaster. The interactive maps featured on the website show images of areas with fires or floods, taken by NASA's AQUA satellite. Smoke clouds can also be seen to the southwest of Buenos Aires within the movable lens icon, which displays images captured by astronauts on the International Space Station.          

 

February 2, 2017
On January 24, 2017, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on the Landsat 8 satellite acquired this false-color image of scorched land flanked by actively burning fires.
On January 24, 2017, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on the Landsat 8 satellite acquired this false-color image of scorched land flanked by actively burning fires.  Wildfires continued to ravage Chile’s countryside in early February 2017, weeks after they flared up in mid-January. The blazes have thwarted firefighters’ efforts to control them, with new hot spots emerging daily. Satellite data and scientific analysis suggest the fires are among the worst the country has seen in decades. Since the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite began collecting data in 2002, fires have occurred in a fairly steady, cyclical pattern in Chile, rising during the dry season and falling during wetter months. Between 2003 and 2016, MODIS detected an average of 330 daytime fire hot spots throughout Chile during the month of January. In 2017, the number jumped tenfold. “This is unprecedented from my perspective. The smoke plumes are huge in abundance and altitude,” said Michael Fromm, a meteorologist with the Naval Research Laboratory who has been studying satellite fire data for 15 years. “Fires have gotten much larger and much more energetic than typical for that area.”

 

January 24, 2017
On January 20, 2017, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired an image of brown smoke billowing from a cluster of fires near the coastal city of Pichilemu.
On January 20, 2017, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired an image of brown smoke billowing from a cluster of fires near the coastal city of Pichilemu. Smoke from dozens of forest fires billowed over central Chile in January 2017. A heat wave, coupled with strong winds, spread the flames on January 20, prompting President Michelle Bachelet to declare a state of emergency in some areas. On January 20, 2017, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired an image of brown smoke billowing from a cluster of fires near the coastal city of Pichilemu. Red outlines indicate areas with heat signatures indicative of active burning. Smoke plumes stretch northward and over the Pacific Ocean. The second, wider view (below), acquired by Terra on January 21, shows fires spread across the region. Far to the north and west, brown smoke hovers over marine clouds.

 

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