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Disaster Updates

  • This animation shows the heavy precipitation that Hurricane Barry (2019) produced from July 11th to 16tj in the Gulf of Mexico and the South Central U.S. While forecasters were initially concerned that the largest accumulations would extend far over land, this animation shows that the largest accumulations remained mostly off shore. The precipitation estimates shown in this animation come from...
    GPM IMERG rainfall accumulation from Hurricane Barry.
  • The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, created this map depicting areas that are likely damaged as a result of the recent major earthquakes in Southern California. The color variation from yellow to red indicates increasingly more significant surface change, or damage. The map covers an area of 155 by 186 miles (250 by 300...
    The map shows estimated damage from the 2019 Southern California Earthquakes, with the color variation from yellow to red indicating increasingly more significant surface change, or damage.
  • GPM Core Observatory rainfall rates from Tropical Storm Barry captured July 11th, 2019 at 8:26am CT. Credit: Jacob Reed / NASA GSFC NASA / JAXA’s GPM Core Observatory passed over developing Tropical Depression 2 (which was upgraded to Tropical Storm Barry later in the morning) in the Gulf...
    GPM Core Observatory rainfall rates from Tropical Storm Barry captured July 11th, 2019 at 8:26am CT. Credit: Jacob Reed / NASA GSFC
  • UPDATE 7/11/19: This new imagery from the NASA-JPL ARIA team shows a decorrelation map on the left that shows surface rupture and disturbance, and an updated surface deformation map on the right produced at a higher resuolution of 30m. Credit: NASA-JPL, JAXA, The ARIA team at NASA-JPL...
    This imagery from the NASA-JPL ARIA team shows a decorrelation map on the left that shows surface rupture and disturbance, and an updated surface deformation map on the right produced at a higher resuolution of 30m. Credit: NASA-JPL, JAXA,
  • Planet Earth is hotter than ever. Seas are invading formerly dry land. Dry is dryer, and wet wetter. Weather extremes threaten life and property as never before, whether it’s ongoing flooding in the U.S. Midwest and, in June, extensive inundations in southern Uruguay or volcanic eruptions in the Kuril Island chain and Papua New Guinea.  The threat of natural disasters continues unabated, with...
    Members of the NASA Disasters Program, including Program Manager David Green, attended the Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction meeting in May 2019 to speak at the Second Multi-Hazard Early Warning Conference.
 

About the NASA Disasters Program

The Disasters Applications area promotes the use of Earth observations to improve prediction of, preparation for, response to, and recovery from natural and technological disasters. Disaster applications and applied research on natural hazards support emergency preparedness leaders in developing mitigation approaches, such as early warning systems, and providing information and maps to disaster response and recovery teams.

 

Earth Observatory

July 12, 2019

Wildfires in Krasnoyarsk
Dozens of fires raged in the southern part of the Siberian region.

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July 11, 2019

Another Fire in Greenland
Nearly two years after an unusual fire in western Greenland, satellites have spotted smoke plumes streaming from the same region once again.

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July 9, 2019

Historic Heat in Alaska
Record-breaking heat has exacerbated clusters of wildfires burning throughout the state.

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July 8, 2019

Scientists Discover the Biggest Seaweed Bloom in the World
The record-breaking belt of brown algae stretches from West Africa to the Gulf of Mexico, and it is likely here to stay.

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July 8, 2019

Smoke Spreads Across Ontario
Smoke from fires burning along the Ontario border dipped south into the United States.

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