Tropical Cyclone Debbie 2017

Start Date

March 24, 2017

Overview

On March 28, Tropical Cyclone Debbie made landfall in Australia with gusts reaching over 160 MPH.  To prepare for what had been predicted to be the worst storm hitting Queensland since 2011, over 25,000 were urged to evauate. The wind damage, storm surge, and heavy rain that result from tropical cyclones can cause damage to property and affect lives. The NASA Disasters Program is working assess these effects in order to support the Australian response effort.

Latest Updates

April 4, 2017
Sentinel-1 flood map from Australia.
The NASA SPoRT team provided change detection products that highlight recent flood waters in Australia from Tropical Cyclone Debbie using Sentinel-1 data. These products were developed in conjunction with colleagues at the Alaska Satellite Facility (https://www.asf.alaska.edu/). The change detection is a simple algorithm is based detecting change that is consistent with flooding using a pre- and post-event scene. The product’s final...
March 29, 2017
Animated 3D look at precipitation from tropical cyclone Debbie.
Tropical cyclone Debbie formed in the Coral Sea northeast of Australia om March 24, 2017. Debbie intensified and had hurricane force wind speeds within a day of formation. While headed toward northeastern Australia Debbie reached it's maximum sustained wind speeds estimated at over 100 kts (115 mph) on March 27, 2017 (UTC). Tropical cyclone Debbie came ashore on March 28th and brought destructive winds and extremely heavy rain to northeastern Australia. It was reported that heavy rainfall caused flash flooding that cut off a coastal town and covered several roads in Queensland. ...
March 28, 2017
An inundation map of the region near Proserpine, Australia, produced using the Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS) on 3/28/17.
An inundation map of the region near Proserpine, Australia, produced using the Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS). The GFMS is a NASA-funded experimental system using real-time TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) precipitation information as input to a quasi-global hydrological runoff and routing model.