Super Typhoon Mangkhut 2018

Start Date

September 13, 2018

Overview

In the early hours of September 15, 2018, Super Typhoon Mangkhut (Ompong) blew into Cagayan Province near the northern tip of Luzon, one of the most populated of the Philippine islands. Local reports described wind speeds of 205 kilometers (130 miles) per hour. The storm stretched nearly 900 kilometers (600 miles) across, with an eye 50 kilometers (30 miles) wide. It is the strongest tropical cyclone in any ocean basin so far this year.

On September 14, 2018, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi NPP satellite acquired a natural-color image of Mangkhut just after midday.

On September 14, 2018, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi NPP satellite acquired a natural-color image of Mangkhut just after midday.

On September 14, 2018, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi NPP satellite acquired a natural-color image of Mangkhut just after midday. At 8 p.m. Philippine Standard Time (12:00 Universal Time) on September 14, the U.S. Joint Typhoon Warning Center reported that the storm still had sustained winds of 145 knots (165 miles/270 kilometers per hour), with gusts to 175 knots. Maximum significant wave heights were 40 feet (12 meters).

On September 14, 2018, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi NPP satellite acquired this false-color image of microwave brightness temperatures in Typhoon Mangkhut just after midday.

On September 14, 2018, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi NPP satellite acquired this false-color image of microwave brightness temperatures in Typhoon Mangkhut just after midday.

The second, false-color image shows infrared signals known as brightness temperature. This is useful for distinguishing cooler (dark) cloud tops from the warmer (whiter) clouds and water surfaces below.
 

Disaster Types

Latest Updates

September 20, 2018
Screenshot of the CAMP2Ex web portal interface.
Screenshot of the CAMP2Ex web portal interface. The CAMP2Ex portal (https://camp2ex.jpl.nasa.gov) was developed to support the upcoming NASA’s  CLOUD AND AEROSOL MONSOONAL PROCESSES - PHILIPPINES EXPERIMENT (CAMP2Ex). The portal monitors hurricanes and tropical convection in the West Pacific and the Indian ocean basins.  It provides interactive visualization, data integration and on-line analysis tools. The portal: i) integrates...
September 18, 2018
GPM IMERG rainfall accumulations from Typhoon Mangkhut.
Video of 7-Day Animation of Mangkhut Affecting the Philippines In the past week, Typhoon Mangkhut has affected the Philippines, mainland China, and Hong Kong, as shown in this 7-day animation of NASA's satellite-based IMERG precipitation product. The upper frame shows the storm-total accumulation starting at 0100 UTC on September 11, 2018. Storm-total accumulations in excess of 4 inches stretched from Manila to the northern tip of Luzon Island where the rainfall triggered deadly landslides. The lower frame shows the short-term accumulation in a 3-hour period that slides from the...
September 19, 2018
AMSR-2 rainfall data from Typhoon Mangkhut acquired 9/14/18.
AMSR-2 rainfall data from Typhoon Mangkhut acquired 9/14/18. On September 14, 2018 NASA LANCE Near Real-Time AMSR2 product captured the intense rainfall of Typhoon Mangkhut approached Philippines, which is the 2018’s strongest storm so far.  NASA LANCE Near Real-Time (NRT) AMSR2 products include surface precipitation rate, wind speed over ocean, water vapor over ocean and cloud liquid water over ocean. AMSR2 on JAXA's GCOM-W1 spacecraft launched on May 18, 2012. The NRT...