NASA Participates in the 2020 National Earthquake Conference

On March 4th – 6th 2020 members of the NASA Earth Applied Sciences Disasters Program attended the 2020 National Earthquake Conference in San Diego, CA to connect and collaborate with other agencies and scientists on earthquake research and response.

A slide from Sang-Ho Yun’s talk showing examples of Damage Proxy Maps from different disasters over the past several years. Credit: NASA

A slide from Sang-Ho Yun’s talk showing examples of Damage Proxy Maps from different disasters over the past several years. Credit: NASA 

During the meeting NASA Disasters Program member Sang-Ho Yun presented a talk on damage mapping algorithms and systems using satellite-based Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. The presentation showcased a brief history of the development, production and impact of Damage Proxy Maps (DPMs) for supporting major earthquake response efforts, and highlighted his recent work with the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) to create a color-blind-friendly palette for DPMs. A talk was also given by Eric Fielding of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) on Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) displacement map products that were generated for the Ridgecrest California Earthquakes. Displacement maps can provide information on where fault ruptures may have broken pipelines or other sub-surface infrastructure in addition to the surface damage mapped by DPMs.

Sang-Ho Yun from NASA (right) speaks with Eric Thompson from the USGS (left) at the 2020 National Earthquake Conference. Credit: NASA

Sang-Ho Yun from NASA (right) speaks with Eric Thompson from the USGS (left) at the 2020 National Earthquake Conference. Credit: NASA

Sang-Ho Yun, Eric Fielding, and NASA Disasters Program Coordinator Maggi Glasscoe also met with representatives from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the California Earthquake Clearinghouse and the California Geological Survey (CGS). They discussed topics such as the recent earthquakes in Puerto Rico, the upcoming automated production of improved “DPM2” Damage Proxy Maps, and ways to improve these organizations access to NASA Earth-observing products when responding to disasters. They also coordinated with representatives from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to help plan for their upcoming Infrastructure Resilience Forum taking place May 28th – 29th, 2020 at the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Headquarters in Reston VA, which the NASA Disasters Program also plans to participate in. 

Learn more about the National Earthquake Conference: https://earthquakeconference.org/ 

The NASA Disasters Program aids communities around the world in resilience, response, and recovery from earthquakes and other disasters. The program develops both research and real-world applications of Earth-observing data for responding to earthquakes through its A.37  ROSES Project Portfolio, and is constantly seeking collaboration and feedback from partners in the earthquake and disaster communities through events such as National Earthquake Conference. With each disaster the program responds to, more is learned about hazard, exposure, vulnerability and effective coordination. This improves the program’s ability to respond effectively and helps to develop more resilient communities around the world.

Learn more about the NASA Disasters Program earthquake activities: https://disasters.nasa.gov/earthquakes