Southern Mexico Earthquake 2017

Start Date

September 8, 2017

Overview

A M 8.1 offshore Chiapas Mexico occurred at 2017-09-08 04:49:21 UT. This was an intermediate depth earthquake with an estimated source depth of approximately 70 km. This was the largest of 9 earthquakes M7.0 and larger within 250 km in the past century. The largest reported shaking by USGS Did you feel it? was MMI VIII (Moderate-Heavy Shaking) roughly 200 km from the epicenter. There was an initial tsunami warning, but the threat has now passed (http://www.tsunami.gov/). There have been at least 20 M4 or greater aftershocks in the region. For more details on the event, please go to: https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/us2000ahv0#executive. NASA is coordinating with relevant agencies for this disaster to provide support for this event. 

Disaster Types

Latest Updates

September 13, 2017
ARIA Damage Proxy Map v0.5
The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, created this Damage Proxy Map (DPM) depicting areas of Southern Mexico that are likely damaged as a result of the M8.1 September 7, 2017 (near midnight local time, early morning on 8th UTC) Chiapas earthquake, shown by red and yellow pixels. The map is derived from synthetic aperture...
September 14, 2017
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Copernicus
NASA and its partners are contributing important observations and expertise to the ongoing response to the September 7, 2017 (local time), magnitude 8.1 Oaxaca-Chiapas earthquake in Mexico. This earthquake was the strongest over a century for Mexico. It has caused a significant humanitarian crisis with widespread building damage and triggered landslides throughout the region. Scientists with the Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis project (ARIA), a collaboration...
September 14, 2017
Landslide maps for the 2017 Mexico Earthquake
The global Landslide Hazard Assessment for Situational Awareness (LHASA) model is developed to provide situational awareness of landslide hazards for a wide range of users. Precipitation is a common trigger of landslides. The GPMIntegrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) data shows recent precipitation, updated every thirty minutes. A LHASA landslide “nowcast” is created by comparing GPM data from the last seven days to the long-term precipitation record provided by the...