Latest News and Updates

October 13, 2018
Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) captures sediment stirred up by Michael.  
The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite acquired this natural-color image of seafloor sediment and river outflows (and possibly plankton) discoloring the water along the Gulf Coast of Florida and Alabama. The satellite passed over the area in the early afternoon on October 13, 2018. The sediment and other debris was stirred up by the churning action of wind and waves as Hurricane Michael tore through the area on October 9-10. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) captures sediment stirred up by Michael.  

 

October 16, 2018
Data visualization on October 6, 2018 
NASA's Earth Observatory featured an article showing night lights before and after Hurricane Michael's destruction.  After making landfall as a category 4 storm on October 10, 2018, Hurricane Michael knocked out power for at least 2.5 million customers in the southeastern United States, according to the Edison Electric Institute. These images of nighttime lights in Florida, Georgia, and Alabama come from the Suomi NPP satellite and were acquired on October 6 and October 12, 2018. The first set of images (above) shows a natural view of night lights from the “day-night band” (DNB) of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). The DNB detects light in a range of wavelengths from green to near-infrared, and uses filtering techniques to observe signals such as city lights, auroras, wildfires, and reflected moonlight. The second pair of images is a data visualization of where lights went out in Panama City, Florida. A team of scientists from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center processed and corrected the raw data to filter out stray light from the Moon, fires, airglow, and any other sources that are not electric lights. Their processing techniques also removed other atmospheric interference, such as dust, haze, and thin clouds. The images show conditions on October 6 and October 12, 2018.   Data visualization on October 6, 2018 

 

September 25, 2018
A storm captured by RainCube is seen here in infrared from a single, large weather satellite, NOAA's GOES (Geoweather Operational Environmental Satellite). Image Credit: NOAA 
The same storm captured by RainCube is seen here in infrared from a single, large weather satellite, NOAA's GOES (Geoweather Operational Environmental Satellite). Image Credit: NOAA  The RainCube (Radar in a CubeSat) uses experimental technology to see storms by detecting rain and snow with very small instruments. The people behind the miniature mission celebrated after RainCube sent back its first images of a storm over Mexico in a technology demonstration in August. Its second wave of images in September caught the first rainfall of Hurricane Florence. The small satellite is a prototype for a possible fleet of RainCubes that could one day help monitor severe storms, lead to improving the accuracy of weather forecasts and track climate change over time.

 

October 16, 2018
MODIS Flood Map
MODIS Flood Map  These maps were created from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Near Real-Time Global (NRT) Flood Mapping product. The red color on the map represents new flood waters from October 13 -15, 2018 in Florida. The MODIS Near Real-Time (NRT) Global Flood Mapping Project produces global daily flood water maps at approximately 250 m spatial resolution. NASA Land, Atmosphere Near real-time Capability for EOS (LANCE) provides data to the NRT Global MODIS Flood Mapping initiative. This project was developed in collaboration with Bob Brakenridge at the Dartmouth Flood Observatory (DFO): http://floodobservatory.colorado.edu. Discover and Access MODIS NRT Global Flood Mapping Data: https://floodmap.modaps.eosdis.nasa.gov  

 

September 13, 2018
NASA Applied Sciences Disasters Program meets with University of Puerto Rico in Mayaguez 
NASA Applied Sciences Disasters Program meets with University of Puerto Rico in Mayaguez  On September 13, 2018 Miguel Román and Edil Sepúlveda Carlo of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center hosted a group of professors from the University of Puerto Rico in Mayaguez (UPRM). In attendance, were Professors Dr. Pérez Lugo and Dr. Ortiz García. Lugo and García are co-founders of the National Institute for Energy and Island Sustainability (INESI in Spanish), which is the only interdisciplinary and inter-campus institute of the University of Puerto Rico system. INESI includes the university community in Puerto Rico’s energy policy and seeks to resolve energy and sustainability problems using empirical research and academic knowledge. Dr. David Green, Program Manager of the Earth Science Disasters Program at NASA Headquarters, as well as Shanna McClain, Risk and Resilience Coordinator at NASA Headquarters, were present at the meeting.

 

October 16, 2018
ARIA Cross-Track Interferogram, Sulawesi Earthquake 
ARIA Cross-Track Interferogram, Sulawesi Earthquake    The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Caltech in Pasadena, CA created this false-color map showing deformation in Central Sulawesi, Indonesia, including the city of Palu, as a result of the Magnitude 7.5 earthquake on September 28, 2018. The map is derived from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images from the ALOS-2 satellite, operated by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The images were taken before the earthquake on September 27, 2018 and after the earthquake on October 11, 2018. 

 

October 4, 2018
NASA’s G-III aircraft staged operations from Gainesville, Florida. The UAVSAR pod is located at the bottom of the aircraft’s fuselage.  Credits: NASA/Samuel Choi
  NASA’s G-III aircraft staged operations from Gainesville, Florida. The UAVSAR pod is located at the bottom of the aircraft’s fuselage. Credits: NASA/Samuel Choi In the aftermath of Hurricane Florence, which struck the Carolinas on Sept. 14 causing widespread damage, NASA quickly deployed a sophisticated airborne radar to give disaster response agencies a much-needed view of floodwaters that continued to threaten the region. In response to the event, the feature, "NASA Airborne Team Surveys Flooding from Hurricane Florence," was published on NASA.gov on October 4, 2018. 

 

October 12, 2018
NASA's Black Marble Technology over Florida
The pre- and post-event images of NASA's Black Marble product suite show the artificial lights at night from Panama City, FL and Mexico Beach, FL based on data collected on October 6 and October 12, 2018. NASA's Black Marble product suite has immediate access to data documenting disruptions in energy infrastructure and utility services due to Hurricane Michael. The pre and post event images in Florida are based on the composite Black Marble images. The fine resolution images show artificial lights at night prior to and after the arrival of Hurricane Michael. Areas in high-light condition are in red and yellow, while areas in low-light condition are in blue and black. The Black Marble Level 3 and High Definition (HD) data are continuously being produced and delivered to end-users for the latest day available.

 

October 12, 2018
GPM IMERG rainfall accumulation from Hurricane Michael
At least eleven deaths have now been attributed to deadly hurricane Michael. Some casualties resulted not only from Michael's destructive winds and storm surges but also from the blinding rain that Michael produced as it battered states from Florida northeastward through Virginia. Today tropical storm Michael is moving out over the Atlantic Ocean and has transitioned into a powerful extratropical storm.   This animation using the GPM IMERG multi-satellite dataset shows the estimated total rainfall accumulation for #HurricaneMichael from 10/8/18 - 10/12/18. Learn more: https://t.co/aJuEp6o855 pic.twitter.com/n6e2eEw8om — NASA Precipitation (@NASARain) October 12, 2018 This rainfall accumulation analysis was derived from NASA's Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals data (IMERG). IMERG data were used to calculate estimates of precipitation totals from a combination of space-borne passive microwave sensors, including the GMI microwave sensor on the GPM satellite, and geostationary IR (infrared) data. IMERG data benefits from algorithms developed by NASA's Precipitation Measurement Missions (PMM) science team that supports GPM's Missions. This analysis shows IMERG rainfall accumulation estimates along Michael's track during the period from becoming a tropical depression fourteen off the coast of the Yucatan Peninsula until it passed off the East Coast. Michael's approximate 0000Z and 1200Z locations are shown overlaid on this analysis. IMERG rainfall accumulation data indicated that Michael frequently produced rainfall totals greater than 10 inches (254 mm) along it's track. IMERG data indicated that the heaviest rainfall accumulation occurred off the Yucatan where were over 20 inches (512 mm) were estimated. Also of interest is the heavy rainfall that fell in less than a week with stormy weather extending from Texas to the Great Lakes. Visualization by Matt Lammers and Owen Kelley (NASA GSFC) Caption by Hal Pierce (SSAI / NASA GSFC)

 

October 12, 2018
On October 10, 2018, the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) instrument, onboard JAXA's GCOM-W1 satellite, observed the surface precipitation rates of Hurricane Michael as it approached the United States.
On October 10, 2018, the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) instrument, onboard JAXA's GCOM-W1 satellite, observed the surface precipitation rates of Hurricane Michael as it approached the United States. This LANCE NRT AMSR2 image shows high precipitation rates in red, yellow and light blue, and lower rates in dark blue and purple. LANCE NRT AMSR2 products include surface precipitation rate, wind speed over ocean, water vapor over ocean and cloud liquid water over ocean. NRT AMSR2 products are generated within three hours of observation, using algorithms provided by the NASA-funded US AMSR2 Science Team, with JAXA NRT L1R (resampled brightness temperatures) as input. Discover and Access LANCE AMSR2 NRT data:https://lance.nsstc.nasa.gov/amsr2/data.html View image using NASA Worldview application: https://go.nasa.gov/2ISHh5w

 

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