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October 11, 2018
Sentinel-1 Water Extent Imagery
Using data collected from the European Space Agency's (ESA) Sentinel-1B satellite, scientists at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are able to create maps of the extent of water due to the effects of Hurricane Michael. The synthetic aperture radar (SAR) aboard Sentinel-1B allows for the detection of water on the surface when clouds are present as well as during the night time hours. This product shows three areas: known reference water (blue), anomalous water identified outside the known reference water areas (red), and water detected in known wetlands or barren land (tan). The areas in red would be the likely flood waters due to the effects of Hurricane Michael.

 

October 11, 2018
USGS/NASA Landsat 8 Imagery Hurricane Michael
The True Color RGB composite provides a product of how the surface would look to the naked eye from space. The RGB is created using the red, green, and blue channels of the respective instrument. This product contains pre-event images from September 15, 22, 24, 29 and October 6, 2018. The True Color RGB is produced using the 3 visible wavelength bands (red, green, and blue) from the respective sensor. Some minor atmospheric corrections have occurred. Image produced on 9/26/2018.

 

October 11, 2018
Sentinel-1 RGB Imagery from Hurricane Michael
The Alaska Satellite Facility has developed a false color Red, Green, Blue (RGB) composite image of the Sentinel 1A/B Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) instrument which assigns the co- and cross-polarization information to a channel in the RGB composite. When used to support a flooding event, areas in blue denotes water present at the time of the satellite overpass prior to the landfall of Hurricane Michael. This product shows three areas: known reference water (blue), anomalous water identified outside the known reference water areas (red), and water detected in known wetlands or barren land (tan). The areas in red would be the likely flood waters due to the effects of Hurricane Michael.

 

October 11, 2018
VIIRS Nighttime Imagery
UPDATE 10/12/18: S-NPP VIIRS Nighttime Image on October 6, 2018 before Hurricane Michael S-NPP VIIRS Nighttime Image on October 12, 2018 after Hurricane Michael Clear skies overnight provided ideal view conditions for the VIIRS Day/Night Band sensor to capture the intensity of the city lights post Hurricane Michael. Note the widespread power outages across Florida and Georgia. Interactive viewer: https://maps.disasters.nasa.gov/arcgis/apps/MapSeries/index.html?appid=b... Original Post 10/11/18:

 

October 11, 2018
NASA AIRS captures Hurricane Michael
This image from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) shows the temperature of clouds or the surface in and around Hurricane Michael as it approaches northwestern Florida around 3 AM local time on Tuesday, October 10, 2018. The storm shows all the hallmarks of a powerful, mature hurricane. The large purple area indicates very cold clouds at about -90 F (-68 C) carried high into the atmosphere by deep thunderstorms. These storm clouds are associated with very heavy rainfall. At the center of the cold clouds is the distinct, much warmer eye of the hurricane seen in green. The extensive areas of red away from the storm indicate temperatures of around 60 F (15 C), typical of the surface of the Earth at night. These red areas are mostly cloud-free, with the clear air caused by air motion outward from the cold clouds near the storm center then downward in the surrounding areas. Michael has developed quickly into a dangerous Category 4 storm, with sustained wind of 150 miles per hour. It is currently coming ashore on the Florida Panhandle as the strongest hurricane in that region in recorded history.

 

October 11, 2018
MISR Imagery of Hurricane Michael
NASA's Terra spacecraft shows a three dimensional view of Hurricane Michael and combines two of MISR's nine camera angles. MISR's stereo anaglyph shows a three-dimensional view of Michael and combines two of MISR's nine camera angles. Using 3D red-blue glasses, you can see the 3D effect. Apparent in the 3D stereo anaglyph as well as the height field are a number of bright "clumps." These are groups of strong thunderstorms embedded within the larger circulation of the hurricane. Known as "vortical hot towers," the presence of these features indicates rapid transport of heat energy from the ocean surface into the storm, typically indicative of rapid intensification of the hurricane. In fact, between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. EDT, while MISR imaged the hurricane, the estimated central pressure dropped 8 hPa and the maximum sustained winds increased about 12 mph (19 kph) and over the next 24 hours Hurricane Michael intensified from a Category 2 to a Category 4 storm.

 

October 11, 2018
MISR Imagery Hurricane Michael 
MISR (a NASA instrument that flies aboard the Terra satellite) carries nine cameras fixed at different angles, each of which viewed Michael over the course of approximately seven minutes when it was just off Florida's west coast on Tuesday October 9, 2018. This composite image shows the view from the central, downward-pointing camera (left), the calculated cloud-top heights (middle), and wind velocity vectors (right) superimposed on the image. The length of the arrows is proportional to wind speed and the colors show the altitude of the cloud tops in kilometers. Images from the nine views are used to calculate the height of the cloud tops, and the motion of the clouds between the views provides information on wind speed and direction.

 

October 11, 2018
ISS Imagery Hurricane Michael
These visible-wavelength (RGB) handheld digital camera images of the Hurricane Michael eyewall were taken by astronauts onboard the International Space Station on October 10, 2018 as they passed over the storm. Once the storm has passed and cloud cover lessens, requests to document flooding, changes to the land surface, etc. can be sent to the ISS crew. Imagery of this type is then georeferenced by the Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit at JSC. Click here to view the full image set:   https://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/WebShare/WebShare.pl?folder=NASADisastersProgram/NDP_Hurricane_Michael_Eyewall_10OCT2018 

 

October 11, 2018
NASA MISR Image
NASA MISR Image  NASA’s MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer) instrument on-board the Terra satellite captured Hurricane Michael with the eye in mid swath on October 9, 2018. This MISR image was captured during Terra orbit 100049. MISR carries nine cameras to view the earth at nine widely-spaced angles and provides calibrated images in four spectral bands at each of the angles.

 

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