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August 31, 2017
ISS Georeferenced Digital Camera Images from Houston Flooding 2017
Click here to view the full image collection and download  high quality georeferenced images. This collection of digital camera images was taken by astronauts onboard the International Space Station on August 31st, 2017, then manually georeferenced by members of the Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit at NASA Johnson Space Center

 

August 31, 2017
Flood Proxy Map depicting areas of Southeastern Texas that are likely flooded as a result of Hurricane Harvey, shown by light blue pixels.
The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, created this Flood Proxy Map depicting areas of Southeastern Texas that are likely flooded as a result of Hurricane Harvey, shown by light blue pixels. The map is derived from synthetic aperture radar amplitude images from the European Space Agency's (ESA) Sentinel-1 satellite, taken before (August 5, 2017) and after (August 29, 2017) Hurricane Harvey made landfall. The map covers an area of 155 miles x 211 miles (250 km x 340 km). Each pixel measures about 33 yards x 33 yards (30 m x 30 m). Local ground observations provided anecdotal preliminary validation. Also cross-validated with ARIA ALOS-2 flood proxy map v0.2. This flood proxy map should be used as guidance to identify areas that are likely flooded, and may be less reliable over urban areas. Sentinel-1 data were accessed through the Copernicus Open Access Hub. Contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data 2017. 

 

August 30, 2017
Surface Flooding from Hurricane Harvey Shown in New SMAP Imagery
A new series of images generated with data from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite illustrate the surface flooding caused by Hurricane Harvey from before its initial landfall through August 27, 2017. The SMAP observations detect the proportion of the ground covered by surface water within the satellite's field of view. The sequence of images depicts successive satellite orbital swath observations showing the surface water conditions on August 22, before Harvey's landfall (left), and then on Aug. 27, two days after landfall (middle). The resulting increase in surface flooding from record rainfall over the three-day period, shown at right, depicts regionally heavy flooding around the Houston metropolitan area. The hardest hit areas (blue and purple shades) cover more than 23,000 square miles (about 59,600 square kilometers) and indicate a more than 1,000-fold increase in surface water cover from rainfall-driven flooding. SMAP's low-frequency (L-band) microwave radiometer features enhanced capabilities for detecting surface water changes in nearly all weather conditions and under low-to-moderate vegetation cover. The satellite provides global coverage with one to three-day repeat sampling, which is well suited for monitoring dynamic inland waters around the world. SMAP is managed for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. JPL is managed for NASA by Caltech. A consortium of researchers from other universities participate on the SMAP science team, including the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge; Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey; and the University of Montana in Missoula, which provided the SMAP surface water imagery. For more information about SMAP, visit http://smap.jpl.nasa.gov.

 

August 29, 2017
Astronaut Randy Bresnik took this photo of Tropical Storm Harvey from the International Space Station on Aug. 28 at 1:27 p.m. CDT.
NASA has a lot of resources providing information on Tropical Storm Harvey as it continues to drop tremendous, flooding rainfall on Texas and Louisiana. Satellites like NASA's Aqua satellite and platforms like aircraft and the International Space Station continue to provide various kinds of data on the storm. "NASA focuses on developing new research capabilities that can be used by our partners in the operational and response communities," said Dalia Kirschbaum, Research Physical Scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. "While we continue to innovate in the type of information from satellites, models, and airborne platforms, the main focus is to ensure that the partners that are responding operationally to this event have the information in the format that they need to make effective decisions on emergency response. We continually and actively engage to ensure that the data pipeline is as effective and useful as possible." Astronaut Randy Bresnik took this photo of Tropical Storm Harvey from the International Space Station on Aug. 28 at 1:27 p.m. CDT. The International Space Station has provided a view of Harvey from its orbit in space. On Aug. 28 at 1:27 p.m. CDT Astronaut Randy Bresnik took a photo of Tropical Storm Harvey  

 

August 29, 2017
Flood estimates from GFMS using IMERG input show evolution of flooding over 8/26-8/29, with expansion from Houston area to southeastern Texas and Louisiana.
Flood estimates from GFMS using IMERG input show evolution of flooding over the last few days, with expansion from Houston area to southeastern Texas and Louisiana.    Satellite-based rainfall (GPM IMERG) from now Tropical Storm Harvey over the last three days compares fairly well with raingauges, except for peak values.  IMERG has peaks of about 500 mm (~ 20”) around Houston, whereas gauges indicate over 35”.  Contour at 150 mm, however, agrees reasonably well.  

 

August 28, 2017
GPM IMERG precipitation totals for Hurricane Harvey from August 21st - August 27th 2017.
Despite its earlier demise, after rejuvinating over the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico, Hurricane Harvey has become a major weather maker as it unleashes historical flooding over parts of coastal Texas. Harvey began on the 17th of August as a weak tropical storm about 250 miles (~400 km) east of Barbados in the Leeward Islands. Over the next two days, Harvey continued moving steadily westward passing through the Leeward Islands as a still weak tropical storm and entered into the east central Caribbean. On the 19th, Harvey succumbed to the effects of northeasterly wind shear over the central Caribbean and lost its cyclonic circulation and weakened back into a tropical wave. The remnants of what was once Harvey then passed over the Yucutan Peninsula and into the Bay of Campeche. Typically, it is hard for a system to reform after dissipating as well as after passing over land. However, the environmental conditions were favorable for development and the water temperatures in the Gulf of Mexico very warm. This allowed Harvey first to reform into a tropical depression on the morning of the 23rd of August then strengthen back to a tropical storm later that evening. Having recovered its structure, Harvey was then able take further advantage of the low wind shear and warm waters and continue to intensify, becoming a hurricane by midday on the 24th and then rapidly intensifying overnight into a Category 2 storm with maximum sustained winds reported at 110 mph (~175 kph) by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) at 15:00 UTC (10:00 am CDT) the next morning. Now moving northwest across the western Gulf and Mexico and headed straight for the central Texas coast, Harvey continued to get stronger during the day on the 25th and reached its peak intensity as a Category 4 storm with sustained winds of 130 mph (215 kph) at 6:00 pm CDT according to NHC. Harvey maintained this intensity until it made landfall later that evening at around 10:00 pm CDT as a Category 4 hurricane near Rockport, Texas, about 30 miles east-northeast of Corpus Christi. After making landfall, Harvey weakened and its winds decreased back down to tropical storm intensity by 1:00 pm CDT the next day on the 26th; however, as had been forecast, the steering currents collapsed, bringing the storm to a near stand still just inland from the Texas Gulf Coast and setting the stage for a catostrophic flooding event.

 

August 27, 2017
Flood extent map created by the ARIA team at NASA-JPL/Caltech, derived from the ALOS-2 ScanSAR data acquired 8/27/17 (~1:30PM Central Time) over Texas including Houston.
The above image is a screenshot of the flood extent map created by the ARIA team at NASA-JPL/Caltech, derived from the ALOS-2 ScanSAR data acquired on 8/27/17 (~1:30PM Central Time) over Texas including Houston. This Flood Proxy Map (FPM) covers an area of 350-by-350 km and is derived from Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA's) ALOS-2 PALSAR-2 pre- (2017-07-30) and post-event (2017-08-27) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) amplitude images. The pixels in light blue indicate areas likely flooded. Individual pixel size is about 50-by-50 m. Anecdotal preliminary validation was implemented with some number of local ground observations. This FPM should be used as guidance to identify areas that are likely flooded, and may be less reliable over urban areas. The FPM was created by Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA-JPL/Catech, and the ALOS-2 data were accessed through the International Charter. 

 

August 25, 2017
GPM image of hurricane Harvey on Aug 25 2017
NASA’s Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center collaborated with the Naval Research Laboratory to integrate false color composites of passive microwave brightness temperatures that are helpful for identifying the center of circulation of storms like Hurricane Harvey, especially when thick cloud cover may otherwise obscure the center of the circulation.  A false color composite is generated using 89 GHz brightness temperatures from the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI), identifying the strongest thunderstorms associated with Harvey in bright reds, along with the outermost intense rainbands that were striking the coast of Texas on Friday, August 25 (bottom image).  The eye of the storm can be seen in the center, along with the counterclockwise circulation of the surrounding rainbands.  These images are shared with the National Weather Service and the National Hurricane Center to help integrate the use of unique NASA mission imagery and products within the weather forecasting process.The above image shows rainfall rates for the same overpass at 11:46 UTC which utilizes the GMI and Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR). These data are routinely used by NRL and other forecast groups to improve tropical cyclone tracking and forecasts.  

 

August 25, 2017
GPM precipitation radar data from Hurricane Harvey on 8/25/17.
Hurricane Harvey's has continued to intensify today as it moves toward the Texas coast. Bands of rain from the hurricane were affecting the Gulf coast from Louisiana to southeastern Texas. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission core observatory satellite had another look at hurricane Harvey on August 25, at 7:50 AM CDT (1150 UTC) as it was menacing the Texas gulf coast. GPM's Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instrument scanned precipitation within powerful storms wrapping around the eastern side of the hurricane. DPR found that intense storms in that area were dropping rain at a rate greater than 3.2 inches (82 mm) per hour. GPM's Radar (DPR Ku Band) also was used to examine the 3-D configuration of precipitation within the storms on hurricane Harveys' eastern side. DPR showed that storm tops there reached altitudes above 9.2 miles (14.8 km). GPM's radar found the tallest of these powerful storms in a band of precipitation that was approaching the coastline near the Texas and Louisiana borders. These storms were measured by GPM's radar reaching an altitude of over 10.3 miles (16.6 km). Harvey is expected to be a Category 3 hurricane when it hits the Texas coast near Corpus Christi early Saturday morning. Storm surge flooding along the Texas coast is expected to reach heights of 6 to 12 feet (1.8 - 3.7 meters). Catastrophic flooding is predicted in the area due to an expected 15 to 25 inches (381.0 to 635 mm) of rainfall.

 

August 9, 2017
ISS Georeferenced Digital Camera Images from Venezuela flooding 2017
  Click here to view the full image collection and download  high quality georeferenced images. This collection of digital camera images was taken by astronauts onboard the International Space Station on August 9st, 2017, then manually georeferenced by members of the Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit at NASA Johnson Space Center

 

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