Latest News and Updates

September 21, 2017
IMERG precipitation accumulation from Hurricane Maria 9/17/17 - 9/21/17
Hurricane Maria has caused catastrophic flooding in Puerto Rico. Extreme flooding was reported in the streets of San Juan, the capital of Puerto Rico. The National Weather Service issued flash flood warnings for the entire island. Hurricane Maria has now moved to the northwest of Puerto Rico but is still expected to contribute to rainfall over the island on Friday. Feeder bands are transporting rain over Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic even as the hurricane moves toward the Turks and Caicos islands. NASA's Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) data were used to estimate the total amount of rain that Hurricane Maria dropped from September 17 to early September 21, 2017. During that period Maria dropped heavy rain in the Leeward Islands, Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. IMERG estimated that rainfall totals greater than 10 inches (254 mm) were common along Maria's track. IMERG rainfall estimates indicated that more than 20 inches (512 mm) of rain fell over a large part of Puerto Rico. Video of NASA Measures Hurricane Maria's Track of Torrential Rainfall    

 

September 18, 2017
GPM overpass of hurricane Maria from 9/18/17
Intensifying hurricane Marie is on a path that is predicted to impact the Leeward Islands. Hurricane Irma caused death and wide spread destruction there less than two weeks ago. Very powerful convective storms and multiple lightning strokes within Maria have been cited as proof that Maria is an energetic intensifying hurricane. The GPM core observatory satellite had an excellent view of hurricane Maria when it passed almost directly above the hurricane on September 17, 2017 at 1001 PM AST (September 18, 2017 0201 UTC). GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) showed that Maria had well defined bands of precipitation rotating around the eye of the tropical cyclone. GPM's radar (DPR Ku band) found rain falling at a rate of over 6.44 inches (163.7 mm) per hour in one of these extremely powerful storms northeast of Maria's eye. A 3-D view of Maria's precipitation structure was accomplished using data from GPM's Radar (DPR Ku band). Intense thunderstorms were found towering to above 9.7 miles (15.7 km). This kind of chimney cloud, also called a "hot tower" (as it releases a huge quantity of latent heat by condensation). These tall thunderstorms in the eye wall are often a sign that a tropical cyclone is becoming more powerful.

 

September 14, 2017
Landslide maps for the 2017 Mexico Earthquake
The global Landslide Hazard Assessment for Situational Awareness (LHASA) model is developed to provide situational awareness of landslide hazards for a wide range of users. Precipitation is a common trigger of landslides. The GPMIntegrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) data shows recent precipitation, updated every thirty minutes. A LHASA landslide “nowcast” is created by comparing GPM data from the last seven days to the long-term precipitation record provided by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA). Because IMERG data is only available starting in 2014, the record of historical rainfall was established by TMPA, comparing 2001-present. The TMPA rainfall probability distributions were then compared to that of IMERG and the rainfall thresholds were adjusted so that the IMERG data more closely mapped to those of the TMPA archive. The past 7 days of rainfall are considered, with each day is weighted according to their date before present, with the last twenty-four hours having the most impact.

 

September 13, 2017
ARIA Damage Proxy Map v0.5
The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, created this Damage Proxy Map (DPM) depicting areas of Southern Mexico that are likely damaged as a result of the M8.1 September 7, 2017 (near midnight local time, early morning on 8th UTC) Chiapas earthquake, shown by red and yellow pixels. The map is derived from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images from the Copernicus Sentinel-1A and Sentinel-1B satellites, operated by the European Space Agency (ESA), taken before (September 7, 2017 UTC) and after (September 13, 2017 UTC) the earthquake. The map covers an area of 155 by 106 miles (250 by 170 kilometers). Each pixel measures about 33 yards (30 meters) across. The color variation from yellow to red indicates increasingly more significant ground surface change. Preliminary validation was done by comparing to optical satellite imagery by the DigitalGlobe. This damage proxy map should be used as guidance to identify damaged areas, and may be less reliable over vegetated areas. Sentinel-1 data were accessed through the Copernicus Open Access Hub. Image contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2017), processed by ESA and analyzed by NASA-JPL/Caltech ARIA team. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.pernicus Sentinel data (2017), processed by ESA and analyzed by NASA-JPL/S.Yun (Project PI under NASA Disasters Program). Data processing: NASA-JPL/Caltech ARIA team.   

 

September 12, 2017
ISS Georeferenced Digital Camera Images from Hispaniola flooding 2017
Click here to view the full image collection and download  high quality georeferenced images. This collection of digital camera images was taken by astronauts onboard the International Space Station on September 12th, 2017, then manually georeferenced by members of the Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit at NASA Johnson Space Center.

 

September 12, 2017
ISS Georeferenced Digital Camera Images of Bermuda Flooding from Hurricane Irma 2017
Click here to view the full image collection and download  high quality georeferenced images. This collection of digital camera images was taken by astronauts onboard the International Space Station on September 12th, 2017, then manually georeferenced by members of the Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit at NASA Johnson Space Center.

 

September 12, 2017
ISS Georeferenced Digital Camera Images from Florida flooding 2017
Click here to view the full image collection and download  high quality georeferenced images. This collection of digital camera images was taken by astronauts onboard the International Space Station on Septmber 12th, 2017, then manually georeferenced by members of the Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit at NASA Johnson Space Center.

 

September 12, 2017
ARIA Damage Proxy Map of Southern Florida from Hurricane Irma
The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, created this Damage Proxy Map (DPM) depicting areas of Southwestern Florida, including Key West and Naples, that are likely damaged as a result of Hurricane Irma (Category 4 at landfall in Florida), shown by red and yellow pixels. The map is derived from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images from the European Space Agency's (ESA) Sentinel-1 satellite, taken before (August 29, 2017) and after (September 10, 2017) Hurricane Irma made landfall. The map covers an area of 53 miles x 118 miles (85 km x 190 km). Each pixel measures about 33 yards x 33 yards (30 m x 30 m). The color variation from yellow to red indicates increasingly more significant ground surface change. Preliminary validation was done by comparing to optical satellite imagery by the DigitalGlobe. This damage proxy map should be used as guidance to identify damaged areas, and may be less reliable over vegetated areas. Sentinel-1 data were accessed through the Copernicus Open Access Hub. Contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data 2017. 

 

September 12, 2017
GPM IMERG precipitation totals from hurricane Irma 9/5/17 - 9/12/17
Hurricane Irma dropped extremely heavy rain at times during it’s trek from near the Cape Verdi Islands through the northern Leeward islands, Cuba and the southeastern United States. Over 16 inches (406 mm) of rain was reported in Guantanamo, in the easternmost province of Cuba, as the category five hurricane battered the country. Almost 16 inches (406 mm) of rain was also reported at Fort Pierce on the eastern side of Florida. Charleston, South Carolina reported 6 inches (152.4 mm) of rain in 24 hour. This heavy rainfall plus storm surge flooding caused the worst flooding in Charleston since hurricane Hugo hit the state in 1989. Today, hurricane Irma is a remnant low over the Tennessee valley. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) stopped issuing advisories on Irma on September 11, 2017 at 11 PM EDT (0300 UTC). Video of NASA Adds up Hurricane Irma's Trek of Heavy Rainfall   NASA's Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) data were used to estimate the total amount of rain that Hurricane Irma dropped from September 5 to early September 12, 2017. During that period Irma dropped heavy rain along it’s path from the Leeward Islands until dissipation over the southeastern United States. Rainfall totals were often greater than 6 inches (152.5 mm) around Irma. The greatest IMERG rainfall estimates were indicated by more than 20 inches (512 mm) over Cuba.

 

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