Latest News and Updates

February 17, 2018
SARs image of the Oaxaca Mexico Earthquake.
Rewrapped Sentinel-1 Interferogram for the M7.2 Pinotepa de Don Luis, Mexico earthquake from Feb 16, 2018.  Ascending Sentinel-1 SAR interferogram rewrapped to 10cm color contours of line-of-sight surface deformation. The frame was processed automatically by the UAF SARVIEWS processing service (http://sarviews-hazards.alaska.edu/). Sentinel-1 data from 02/05/18 and 02/17/18 was used. Contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data [2018]. Data accessed through the Alaska Satellite Facility. Information was available for public download within 24 hours of event. Intererograms show surface deformation and can be used to estimate damage and shaking during event. Image products can be used for damage assessment.

 

February 9, 2018
UAVSAR image of Montecito debris flows.
Extreme winter rains in January 2018 following the Thomas Fire in Ventura and Santa Barbara Counties caused severe debris flows, destroying 73 homes and damaging over 160 structures in the town on Montecito, just east of Santa Barbara. NASA UAVSAR airborne radar platform detected changes caused by the debris flows between two images acquired on November 2, 2017 and February 5, 2018. An enhanced image pair (top left) show disturbed areas in orange. The two image pairs can’t be matched and decorrelate in areas of severe surface disruption from the fire scar and debris flows (top right). In the middle panels the radar images are overlaid on the structure damage map produced by the County of Santa Barbara. The fire scars and damage correspond well with the risk map (lower left) and damage map (lower right).  With an operational system, products such as this have the potential to augment the information available for search and rescue, and for damage assessment for government agencies or for the insurance industries. Radar has the advantage of being all-weather with the ability to image through clouds.

 

February 3, 2018
Mt. Fuego eruption
  It is one of Central America’s most active volcanos. Volcán de Fuego puffs continuously without notice by nearby communities, punctuated by episodes with explosive activity, huge ash plumes, and lava flows. The Guatemalan volcano is at it again, beginning its latest bout of unruly behavior on January 31, 2018. On the next day, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 captured these natural-color images of the eruption. Ash in a volcanic plume typically appears brown or gray, while steam appears white. You can see a wider view of the volcano here. Fuego is located about 70 kilometers (40 miles) west of Guatemala City. According to the Coordinadora Nacional para la Reducción de Desastres (CONRED), the plume reached an altitude of 6,500 meters (21,300) feet above sea level and was carried 40 kilometers (25 miles) to the west and southwest by the winds. Falling ash affected tens of thousands of people, primarily in the provinces of Escuintla and Chimaltenango. Lava from two active conduits flowed through four ravines, leading officials to preemptively close National Route 14 to vehicles.

 

February 2, 2018
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A groundbreaking new study by researchers at Old Dominion University and the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) challenges decades of conventional wisdom about the sinking of land in southeastern Virginia. That land in Hampton Roads is sinking is not in question. But David Bekaert, radar scientist at JPL, and Ben Hamlington, assistant professor of ocean, earth and atmospheric sciences at ODU, have gathered data suggesting that land subsidence is occurring at substantially different levels in different parts of the region.

 

January 29, 2018
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NASA’s satellite instruments are often the first to detect wildfires burning in remote regions, and the locations of new fires are sent directly to land managers worldwide within hours of the satellite overpass. Together, NASA instruments, including a number built and managed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, detect actively burning fires, track the transport of smoke from fires, provide information for fire management, and map the extent of changes to ecosystems, based on the extent and severity of burn scars.

 

January 12, 2018
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Water is coming. Where will it hit first and hardest? That’s something residents can see for themselves using an interactive flood prediction map devised by the Virginia Institute of Marine Science and validated by data collected by hundreds of citizen-scientists during last fall’s king tide tracking event.

 

January 12, 2018
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Winter rains falling on recently burned ground triggered deadly mudslides in Santa Barbara County, California on January 9. NASA calculated the amount of rain fall between January 8 and 10, 2018 and calculated the potential for landslides.

 

January 11, 2018
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This workshop will identify challenges and gaps in the incorporation of remote sensing and modeling into coastal hazards decision-making, and will assist NASA to build capacity for research and disaster response related to individual and cascading coastal hazards.

 

January 11, 2018
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Murray, who is based at Langley Research Center, keeps an eye on them all because natural catastrophes are his job. He’s an associate manager of NASA’s disasters program. In its fiscal year ending Sept. 30, the agency responded to 106 disastrous events worldwide, providing data and images from its network of satellites and aircraft. That information has been used for everything from positioning power restoration crews in the wake of hurricanes to crafting no-fly zones after volcanic eruptions. “If there’s a major event anywhere, we’re providing something to somebody,” Murray said.

 

January 11, 2018
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NASA announced Sept 26 that Old Dominion University researcher Ben Hamlington will serve as the agency's Sea Level Change Team (SLCT) for the next three years. The new SLCT consists of eight members selected from 20 research proposals. Hamlington's research proposal, "Identifying, Quantifying and Projecting Decadal Sea Level Change" was chosen from five proposals to lead the team. According to NASA, the program is intended to integrate research to improve the accuracy of sea level rise estimates and communicate those results in a simplified manner to the scientific community and general public.

 

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