Latest News and Updates

September 20, 2018
Screenshot of the CAMP2Ex web portal interface.
Screenshot of the CAMP2Ex web portal interface. The CAMP2Ex portal (https://camp2ex.jpl.nasa.gov) was developed to support the upcoming NASA’s  CLOUD AND AEROSOL MONSOONAL PROCESSES - PHILIPPINES EXPERIMENT (CAMP2Ex). The portal monitors hurricanes and tropical convection in the West Pacific and the Indian ocean basins.  It provides interactive visualization, data integration and on-line analysis tools. The portal: i) integrates model forecasts with satellite and airborne observations from a variety of instruments and platforms, allowing for easy model/observations comparisons; ii) Allows interrogation of a large number of atmospheric and ocean variables to better understand the large-scale and storm-scale processes associated with tropical convection.  This NASA-funded system (CAMP2Ex, ESTO/AIST) provides very rich information for near-real time and post-hurricane analyses to support research of tropical convection.

 

September 20, 2018
Screenshot from the North Atlantic Hurricane Watch web portal.
Screenshot from the North Atlantic Hurricane Watch web portal. The North Atlantic Hurricane Watch (NAHW – https://nahw.jpl.nasa.gov ) portal monitors hurricanes and tropical convection in the North Atlantic and East Pacific ocean basins.  It provides interactive visualization, data integration and on-line analysis tools. The portal: i) integrates model forecasts with satellite and airborne observations from a variety of instruments and platforms, allowing for easy model/observations comparisons; ii) Allows interrogation of a large number of atmospheric and ocean variables to better understand the large-scale and storm-scale processes associated with hurricane genesis, track and intensity changes.  This portal provides very rich information for near-real time and post-hurricane analyses. This NASA-funded system (ESTO/AIST and the HSRP) was developed in close collaboration with NOAA/AOML/HRD to support hurricane research.

 

September 18, 2018
GPM IMERG rainfall accumulations from Typhoon Mangkhut.
Video of 7-Day Animation of Mangkhut Affecting the Philippines In the past week, Typhoon Mangkhut has affected the Philippines, mainland China, and Hong Kong, as shown in this 7-day animation of NASA's satellite-based IMERG precipitation product. The upper frame shows the storm-total accumulation starting at 0100 UTC on September 11, 2018. Storm-total accumulations in excess of 4 inches stretched from Manila to the northern tip of Luzon Island where the rainfall triggered deadly landslides. The lower frame shows the short-term accumulation in a 3-hour period that slides from the beginning to the end of the 7-day-long movie. The sliding 3-hour accumulation clearly shows how Mangkhut's compact eyewall prior to its Philippines landfall was replaced by a much larger, ragged eyewall thereafter. In some cases, interactions with mountainous islands greatly reduce a tropical cyclone's rainfall, but in this case, Typhoon Mangkhut was too powerful to succumb to these mountain interactions.

 

September 18, 2018
This MODIS flood detection map from 9/19/18 shows the 1-day flood product (in red), on top of the 1-day surface water product (in yellow) in Google Earth.
UPDATE 9/19/18: This MODIS flood detection map from 9/19/18 shows the 1-day flood product (in red), on top of the 1-day surface water product (in yellow) in Google Earth. The MODIS Near Real-Time Global Flood Mapping Project produces global daily surface and flood water maps at approximately 250 m resolution, in 10x10 degree tiles. This project was developed in collaboration with Bob Brakenridge at the Dartmouth Flood Observatory (DFO): http://floodobservatory.colorado.edu UPDATE 9/18/18: This MODIS flood detection map from 9/18/18 shows the 1-day flood product (in red), on top of the 1-day surface water product (in yellow) in Google Earth. 

 

September 19, 2018
AMSR-2 rainfall data from Typhoon Mangkhut acquired 9/14/18.
AMSR-2 rainfall data from Typhoon Mangkhut acquired 9/14/18. On September 14, 2018 NASA LANCE Near Real-Time AMSR2 product captured the intense rainfall of Typhoon Mangkhut approached Philippines, which is the 2018’s strongest storm so far.  NASA LANCE Near Real-Time (NRT) AMSR2 products include surface precipitation rate, wind speed over ocean, water vapor over ocean and cloud liquid water over ocean. AMSR2 on JAXA's GCOM-W1 spacecraft launched on May 18, 2012. The NRT AMSR2 products are generally available 90 minutes after observation.   

 

September 18, 2018
ARIA damage proxy map derived from images taken before (September 02, 2016) and 12 hours after the hurricane's landfall (September 14, 2018 7:06 PM local time).
UPDATE 9/18/18:ARIA damage proxy map derived from images taken before (September 02, 2016) and 12 hours after the hurricane's landfall (September 14, 2018 7:06 PM local time). The ARIA team has created a flood extent map from Sentinel-1 SAR data acquired from Track 4, 12 hours after the landfall of Hurricane Florence. The map was pushed to the FEMA's SFTP server and is available to download from  https://aria-share.jpl.nasa.gov/events/201809-Hurricane_Florence/DPM/   The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, created this Damage Proxy Map (DPM) depicting areas of Carolinas that are likely damaged (shown by red and yellow pixels) as a result of Hurricane Florence. The map is derived from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images from the Copernicus Sentinel-1 satellites, operated by the European Space Agency (ESA). The images were taken before (September 02, 2016) and 12 hours after the hurricane's landfall (September 14, 2018 7:06 PM local time).

 

September 14, 2018
GEOS wind speeds visualization of Hurricane Florence.
Having churned through the Atlantic for two weeks, Hurricane Florence is among the longest-lived cyclones of the 2018 season. That means the storm’s winds have had plenty of time to rage and ease as they ran into different environmental conditions over the Atlantic Ocean. This animation highlights the storm’s wind field between September 1 and September 14, 2018. The strongest winds appear red; weaker winds are white. The wind data comes from the Goddard Earth Observing System Model (GEOS), an experimental weather model that scientists at NASA use to analyze global weather phenomena. The GEOS model ingests wind data from more than 30 sources, including ships, buoys, radiosondes, dropsondes, aircraft, and satellites. Having churned through the Atlantic for two weeks, #HurricaneFlorence is among the longest-lived cyclones of the 2018 season. That means the storm’s winds have had plenty of time to rage & ease as they ran into different conditions over the ocean. Look: https://t.co/6uqdmdVMns pic.twitter.com/a1nkk96zIr — NASA (@NASA) September 15, 2018 Florence emerged off the west coast of Africa near Cape Verde on September 1. As the tropical storm drifted west, it slowly intensified until achieving hurricane status on September 4 with peak winds of 75 miles (120 kilometers) per hour. By tradition, meteorologists use the Saffir-Simpson scale to categorize hurricane intensity. Category 1 hurricanes have winds of between 74 and 95 miles (119 and 153 kilometerss) per hour; Category 5 storms, the highest on the scale, have winds that surpass 157 miles (252 kilometers) per hour.

 

September 15, 2018
LANCE imagery of water vapor, precipitation, and wind speed in Hurricane Florence from 9/15/18 viewed in NASA Worldview.
LANCE imagery of water vapor, precipitation, and wind speed in Hurricane Florence from 9/15/18 viewed in NASA Worldview. NASA’s Land, Atmosphere Near real-time Capability for EOS (Earth Observing System) (LANCE) provides data and imagery from Terra, Aqua, Aura, Suomi NPP and GCOM-W1 satellites in less than 3 hours from satellite observation, to meet the needs of the near real-time (NRT) applications community. LANCE leverages existing satellite data processing systems in order to provide data and imagery available from select EOS instruments (currently AIRS, AMSR2, ISS LIS, MISR, MLS, MODIS, MOPITT, OMI, OMPS, and VIIRS). These data meet the timely needs of applications such as numerical weather and climate prediction, forecasting and monitoring natural hazards, agriculture, air quality and disaster relief. LANCE NRT AMSR2 L2B products include surface precipitation rate, wind speed over ocean, water vapor over ocean and cloud liquid water over ocean. The LANCE AMSR element at the AMSR SIPS generates Level-2B swath and incremental Level-3 daily products from the AMSR2 instrument on JAXA's GCOM-W1 satellite. The AMSR2 instrument was designed to detect water in all its state phases in the environment and monitor the water processes that exert a strong influence on climate and weather. NRT AMSR2 products are generally available 90 minutes after observation. AMSR-2 on JAXA's GCOM-W1 spacecraft, launched May 18, 2012. 

 

September 15, 2018
GFMS flood detection / intensity forecast for 9/18/18 
The GFMS is a NASA-funded experimental system using real-time TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) and Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Integrated Multi-Satellite Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) precipitation information as input to a quasi-global (50°N - 50°S) hydrological runoff and routing model running on a 1/8th degree latitude/longitude grid. Flood detection/intensity estimates are based on 13 years of retrospective model runs with TMPA input, with flood thresholds derived for each grid location using surface water storage statistics (95th percentile plus parameters related to basin hydrologic characteristics). Streamflow,surface water storage,inundation variables are also calculated at 1km resolution.In addition, the latest maps of instantaneous precipitation and totals from the last day, three days and seven days are displayed. GFMS flood inundation map for 9/15/18 GFMS flood inundation map for 9/15/18

 

September 15, 2018
VIIRS Black Marble nighttime data showing pre and post event imagery from Wilmington NC.
UPDATE 9/21/18: Suomi-NPP VIIRS Black Marble nighttime data showing pre and post event imagery from Wilmington NC. Suomi-NPP VIIRS Black Marble nighttime data showing pre and post event imagery from Jacksonville NC. The NASA Black Marble product suite has been used to assess disruptions in energy infrastructure and utility services following major disasters. The night-time imageries are useful for pre-event and post-event mapping and monitoring of power outages in cloud-free conditions. UPDATE 9/15/18:

 

Pages