2019 News and Updates

November 1, 2019
Landslide researcher and Disasters Program Center Coordinator Dalia Kirschbaum gives a presentation on the NASA Hyperwall at AGU 2016.
Members of the NASA Earth Applied Sciences Disasters Program will be attending the American Geophysical Union 2019 Fall Meeting this year in San Francisco, CA to give talks, present posters, and teach people about the program and the services it provides.

 

November 1, 2019
Landslide-susceptible settlements in the Kutupalong refugee camp in South Bangladesh. Credit NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
This is the first in a series of articles profiling NASA’s role in contributing to the Sendai Framework, a United Nations initiative to help communities worldwide manage, mitigate and plan responses to a wide array of disasters. The Sendai Framework was adopted by U.N. member states on March 18, 2015 during a conference on disaster risk reduction in Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture, Japan.

 

October 23, 2019
The attendees of NASA’s 2019 Disaster Risk Reduction Workshop in Rio.
Groups are meeting in Rio de Janeiro this week to discuss the progress made in the landslide modeling work and kick off a new project focused on urban flood modeling. The “Applied Sciences for Disaster Risk Reduction Workshop” and other outreach and scientific engagement events will feature technical discussions with city management and scientists to connect the scientific modeling efforts to decision making needs around the city.

 

October 21, 2019
Animation depicting the GOES-16 Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) Fire Temperature product overlaid on the GeoColor product.  The red area is the Saddleridge fire and the white plume blowing out over the Pacific Ocean is smoke. Credit: Kyle Hilburn
This animation depicts the the GOES-16 Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) Fire Temperature product overlaid on the NOAA GOES-R GeoColor product for the Saddleridge California region from 10:31am -12:26pm PDT on October 11th, 2019.  The red area shows the Saddleridge fire, and the white plume blowing out over the Pacific Ocean is smoke. This product was developed with support from the NASA Disasters Program at the request of the U.S. Forest Service and National Predictive Services. Satellite fire detections such as these are used to initialize fires in weather models that provide information about smoke impact and fire behavior to governments and disaster response agencies. Presently, the only fire detections used in numerical weather prediction models come from sensors on low Earth orbiting satellites, such as the MODIS and VIIRS sensors.  These sensors provide very high spatial resolution, but only provide detections a few times per day.  The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) on the GOES-R Series provides fire detections every 5 minutes over the United States, which will provide a greater chance of capturing fires that can be missed due to cloud cover or thick smoke.  

 

October 21, 2019
Streamflow and Inundation Maps for 2019 Flooding in Cameroon
The International Charter has been activated by UNOOSA/UN-SPIDER on behalf of the Department of Civil Protection of Cameroon for floods. For additional information on this activation please visit the Charter website. https://disasterscharter.org/web/guest/activations/-/article/flood-flash... The UMD Global Flood Monitoring System (http://flood.umd.edu) has generated these streamflow and inundation maps for the region.

 

September 6, 2019
The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi NPP satellite captured this nighttime composite image as the storm approached the coast at 3:42 a.m. Eastern Time (07:42 UTC) on September 5, 2019.  Credit: NASA Earth Observatory
The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi NPP satellite captured this nighttime composite image as the storm approached the coast at 3:42 a.m. Eastern Time (07:42 UTC) on September 5, 2019.  Credit: NASA Earth Observatory After devastating the Bahamas and grazing Florida and Georgia, Hurricane Dorian rebounded and raked the coast of South Carolina with strong winds, heavy rains, and a storm surge. Wind, falling trees, and flooding damaged power infrastructure in coastal areas of the southeast U.S. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the NASA/NOAA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite captured this nighttime composite image as the storm approached the coast at 3:42 a.m. Eastern Time (07:42 UTC) on September 5, 2019. At the time, Dorian packed maximum sustained winds of 115 miles (185 kilometers) per hour and was moving north at 8 miles per hour. The VIIRS sensor observed thick cloud bands circulating around Dorian’s large eye, the part of the storm with mostly calm weather and the lowest atmospheric pressure. Hurricane eyes average about 20 miles (32 kilometers); the National Hurricane Center reported Dorian’s eye had a diameter of 50 miles (80 kilometers) around the time this image was acquired. Thinner clouds—part of the storm’s higher-level outflow—extended well inland across Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina.

 

September 6, 2019
Screenshot of SAR flood map from Hurricane Dorian on 9/2/19.
Powerful Category 5 Hurricane Dorian struck the northern parts of the Bahamas on Sunday, September 1. Dorian first pummeled the Abaco Islands before stalling and battering Grand Bahama Island more than 40 hours with heavy rain and catastrophic storm surge. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) GOES East satellite provided rapid, highly detailed imaging so that forecasters would have critical information about the storm’s movement. In the evening hours of September 2, the European Space Agency’s Sentinel-1A satellite also passed over the Bahamas, with a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system capable of imaging the land surface through all but the most intense of Dorian’s rainfall bands to afford a view of what was occurring on the ground. The data was then processed by the Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in collaboration with the European Space Agency, the California Institute of Technology and the Earth Observatory of Singapore.  View fullscreen on the NASA Disasters Mapping Portal This interactive map from the NASA Disasters Mapping Portal displays a SAR-derived flood proxy map (FPM) for September 2nd, 2019 overlaid on GOES East imagery from the same time as the Sentinel-1A overpass. By moving the spyglass you can view flooded regions, which are shown in blue. The yellow box indicates the extent of the SAR data collected. With the help of Sentinel-1A, NASA scientists derived products to help identify the storm’s impacts on parts of the Bahamian island chain. These included a false-color composite from the Alaska Satellite Facility, the NASA Distributed Active Archive Center responsible for distributing SAR data.  View fullscreen on the NASA Disasters Mapping Portal

 

September 5, 2019
A damage assessment map derived from satellite data shows conditions on one island in the Bahamas on Sept. 2. Red and yellow areas are likely the most damaged. Credit: NASA-JPL, Caltech, Earth Observatory of Singapore. 
A damage assessment map derived from satellite data shows conditions on one island in the Bahamas on Sept. 2. Red and yellow areas are likely the most damaged. Credit: NASA-JPL, Caltech, Earth Observatory of Singapore. Copyright contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2019), processed by ESA Versión en español NASA has created and provided to emergency response organizations a detailed damage assessment map of the Bahamas based on satellite data after Hurricane Dorian hit the islands earlier this week.  For over a week, a response team from NASA’s Earth Science Disasters Program has worked to create maps of impacts and potential impacts from the storm and make them available to decision makers. The new damage assessment map used satellite data from the European Union’s Sentinel-1 Copernicus instrument to identify areas (shown in red and yellow) that were likely most affected by the storm’s Category 5 winds and storm surge. The map was created by the Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in collaboration with the European Space Agency, the California Institute of Technology and the Earth Observatory of Singapore.

 

September 4, 2019
GPM overpass of Hurricane Dorian
Video of GPM Satellite observes Hurricane Dorian over the Bahamas   The NASA / JAXA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory flew over Hurricane Dorian on September 1st (5:22pm ET / 21:22 UTC) as the storm was directly over Abaco Island in The Bahamas. The satellite captured data on rainfall rates within the storm as it flew over using its Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and GPM Microwave Imager (GMI). In this animation the multi-satellite GPM IMERG product is shown first to illustrate rainfall rates prior to the overpass. When the camera zooms in data from the DPR is shown, revealing the structure and intensity of precipitation within the eye of the storm. At the time of this overpass Dorian was a category 5 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 185 mph (295 km/h) and gusts over 200 mph.

 

September 4, 2019
Screenshot of TEMPEST-D Dorian data.
A new view of Hurricane Dorian shows the layers of the storm, as seen by an experimental NASA weather satellite that's the size of a cereal box. TEMPEST-D reveals rain bands in four layers of the storm as Hurricane Dorian approaches Florida on Sept. 3, 2019. The multiple vertical layers show where the strongest convective "storms" within the hurricane are pushing high into the atmosphere, with pink, red and yellow corresponding to the areas of heaviest rainfall.

 

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