2018 News and Updates

September 15, 2018
VIIRS Black Marble nighttime data showing pre and post event imagery from Wilmington NC.
UPDATE 9/21/18: Suomi-NPP VIIRS Black Marble nighttime data showing pre and post event imagery from Wilmington NC. Suomi-NPP VIIRS Black Marble nighttime data showing pre and post event imagery from Jacksonville NC. The NASA Black Marble product suite has been used to assess disruptions in energy infrastructure and utility services following major disasters. The night-time imageries are useful for pre-event and post-event mapping and monitoring of power outages in cloud-free conditions. UPDATE 9/15/18:

 

September 15, 2018
VIIRS cloud mask product.
UPDATE 9/19/18: Suomi-NPP VIIRS cloud mask product. Click here to view the animated VIIRS cloud mask product. It is the new image from VIIRS Cloud Mask product on September 17, 2018. Hurricane Florence moved to Maryland and brought heavy rain, and then Florence was moving toward New England. More than 2 inches of rain were reported in many areas in Maryland, according to the National Weather Service. UPDATE 9/14/18: On Sept 14, 2018 the VIIRS instrument aboard Suomi-NPP captured a true-color image of Florence around 1:30 pm local time. The VIIRS image revealed a cloud-filled eye. At the time of the image, Florence' center arrived in the coast of southeastern North Carolina.

 

September 15, 2018
Sentinel 1A overpass of coastal North and South Carolina from 9/14/18. Contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2017), processed by ESA. 
Sentinel 1A overpass of coastal North and South Carolina from 9/14/18. Contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2018), processed by ESA.  Mission description: Sentinel 1A/B is a two satellite synthetic aperture radar constellation operated by the European Space Agency. The backscattered microwave energy from the ground can be used to map flooded areas, and estimate wind speeds over the ocean. Both satellites have a 12-day repeat cycle, providing imagery at about 20m resolution every 6 days over the same area using both sensors.  Learn more about Sentinel: https://sentinel.esa.int/web/sentinel/missions/sentinel-1

 

September 15, 2018
CYGNSS Ocean Windspeed data from Hurricane Florence acquired 9/14/18.
UPDATE 9/27/18: CYGNSS Ocean Windspeed data from Hurricane Florence acquired 9/14/18. CYGNSS Ocean Windspeed data from Hurricane Florence is available to view on the University of Miama Rosentiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science website: http://andrew.rsmas.miami.edu/bmcnoldy/cygnss/?d=20180914 UPDATE 9/17/18: CYGNSS ocean surface (10m referenced) wind speed during overpasses of Hurricane Florence on 10 Sep (left) and 11 Sep (right) 2018. The storm center is identifiable in the vicinity of maximum wind speed values.

 

September 15, 2018
The images were taken before (September 09, 2018) and 36 hours after the hurricane's landfall (September 15, 2018 18:57 PM local time).
UPDATE 9/18/18:The images were taken before (September 09, 2018) and 36 hours after the hurricane's landfall (September 15, 2018 18:57 PM local time).  The ARIA team has created a flood extent map from Sentinel-1 SAR data acquired from Track 106, 36 hours after the landfall of Hurricane Florence. The map was pushed to the FEMA's SFTP server and is available to download from  https://aria-share.jpl.nasa.gov/201809-Hurricane_Florence/FPM/ The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, created this Flood Proxy Map depicting areas of Carolinas that are likely flooded as a result of Hurricane Florence, shown by light blue pixels. The map is derived from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images from the Copernicus Sentinel-1 satellites, operated by the European Space Agency (ESA). The images were taken before (September 09, 2018) and 36 hours after the hurricane's landfall (September 15, 2018 18:57 PM local time).

 

September 14, 2018
This natural-color image shows how Hurricane Florence appeared from above to the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite on September 11, 2018. The second image, acquired by CloudSat on the same day, shows a cross-secti
This natural-color image shows how Hurricane Florence appeared from above to the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite on September 11, 2018. The second image, acquired by CloudSat on the same day, shows a cross-section—how the storm would look if it had been sliced near the middle and viewed from the side.  In April 2006, a Boeing Delta II rocket launched CloudSat, along with a second satellite, CALIPSO, into space on two- and three-year missions to study the world’s clouds and a mix of airborne particles called aerosols. Twelve years later, both satellites are still chugging along, though it has not always been easy going in recent years. In CloudSat’s case, only a series of orbital maneuvers and other technical fixes have kept the satellite returning useful science data in the twilight years of its mission.

 

September 14, 2018
NASA's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) passed over Hurricane Florence as it approached the eastern coast of the United States on Thursday, September 13, 2018.
The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument will provide a unique opportunity for studying the ecology and climate of Earth through the acquisition of global multiangle imagery on the daylit side of Earth. MISR views Earth with cameras pointed in 9 different directions. As the instrument flies overhead, each piece of Earth's surface below is successively imaged by all 9 cameras, in each of 4 wavelengths (blue, green, red, and near-infrared). NASA's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) passed over Hurricane Florence as it approached the eastern coast of the United States on Thursday, September 13, 2018.  NASA's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) passed over Hurricane Florence as it approached the eastern coast of the United States on Thursday, September 13, 2018. At the time the image was acquired, Florence was a large Category 2 storm and coastal areas were already being hit with tropical-storm-force winds. The MISR instrument, flying onboard NASA's Terra satellite, carries nine cameras that observe Earth at different angles. It takes about seven minutes for all the cameras to observe the same location. This stereo anaglyph shows a 3D view of Florence. You will need red-blue 3D glasses, with the red lens placed over the left eye, to view the effect. The anaglyph shows the high clouds associated with strong thunderstorms in the eyewall of hurricane and individual strong thunderstorms in the outer rain bands. These smaller storms can sometimes spawn tornadoes.

 

September 14, 2018
Polarimetric image of Croatan National Forest, NC acquired by a UAVSAR overflight on Sep 23, 2018 . 
Collection of UAVSAR imagery will help to clarify where barrier islands and the coastline have been impacted. Furthermore, rapid acquisition of UAVSAR imagery of damaged homes and infrastructure provides higher spatial resolution details to complement “damage proxy maps” and other change detection approaches applied from routinely collected imagery or special collections from international partners.  NOAA and other agencies will fly complementary aerial photography to help document change for correlation to signals obtained at the wavelengths of UAVSAR (L-Band, polarized) and other assets on orbit.  This will provide 1) scientific opportunity to better understand signals observed in UAVSAR and complementary SAR imagery as they relate to surface change and structural damage 2) opportunities to further develop change/damage products and mapping from UAVSAR and other on-orbit platforms and 3) share UAVSAR imagery in near real-time or reduced latency for local, state, and federal benefits to the immediate needs of response and recovery.

 

September 14, 2018
ISS LIS near-realtime 12 Hour browse image from 9/14/18at  22:41 UTC
The Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), is a space-based instrument used to detect the distribution and variability of total lightning (cloud-to-cloud, intra-cloud, and cloud-to-ground lightning). It measures the amount, rate, and radiant energy of lightning during both day and night. Two LIS instruments were built in the 1990s, one for the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) and a spare which was stored on a shelf for over 20 years. A summary of the two platforms highlights the differences. The TRMM LIS operated successfully for over 17 years, from launch in 1997 until April 2015. The spare LIS was placed in Feb 2017 on the International Space Station (ISS) for a two - four year mission. The position of LIS on the ISS allows for latitudinal measurement extending poleward up to 54°. The goals of LIS on the ISS are to determine the relationship between clouds, lightning, and precipitation, to extend the global lightning climatology record, to examine the physics of lightning discharge, to examine the uses of lightning for improving severe weather warnings, and to estimate lightning nitrogen oxides to improve air-quality modeling. ISS LIS near-realtime 12 Hour browse image from 9/14/18at  22:41 UTC

 

September 14, 2018
The map shown here was generated using sea surface height measurements from the first 10 days (February 12-20, 2015) of data collected once Jason-3 reached its operational orbit of 830 miles (1336 kilometers).
 Jason-3 is the fourth mission in U.S.-European series of satellite missions that measure the height of the ocean surface. Launched on January 17, 2016, the mission will extend the time series of ocean surface topography measurements (the hills and valleys of the ocean surface) begun by the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite mission in 1992 and continuing through the Jason-1 (launched in 2001) and the currently operating OSTM/Jason-2 (launched in 2008) missions. These measurements provide scientists with critical information about circulation patterns in the ocean and about both global and regional changes in sea level and the climate implications of a warming world. The map shown here was generated using sea surface height measurements from the first 10 days (February 12-20, 2015) of data collected once Jason-3 reached its operational orbit of 830 miles (1336 kilometers).  Learn more about Jason-3: https://sealevel.jpl.nasa.gov/missions/jason3/

 

Pages