2018 News and Updates

August 18, 2018
Flood map for Kerala
In the maximum observed flooding map, areas in RED are flooding mapped from Copernicus Sentinel 1 SAR data provided by the European Space Agency. Areas in PURPLE are currently flooded and also flooded in previous years. Areas in BLUE are covered by a reference normal water extent. Areas in LIGHT GRAY are all previously mapped flooding, since 1999. The observed and model-predicted flooding maps from SAR data can be used effectively for monitoring and analyzing the influence of flood water in a flood prone area. The flood product will help to reduce the flood hazard impact and provide critical information in the process of flood management.

 

August 30, 2018
SNPP near-realtime fire detection product
On Saturday August 25, the Manam Island volcano has erupted on the north coast of Papua New Guinea. After the cloud dissipated, lava flows are identified by Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Fires and Thermal Anomalies Near Real-Time product from NASA LANCE.  Red points in the remote sensing image show the locations of lava flows in the Manam Island, on August 27, 2018.  

 

August 26, 2018
This image shows Hurricane Lane as observed by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite on Thursday, August 23. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech
This image shows Hurricane Lane as observed by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite on Thursday, August 23. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech Instruments on NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites were watching as Hurricane Lane -- a category 2 storm as of Friday, Aug. 24 -- made its way toward Hawaii. NASA's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) captured images of Lane on just before noon local time on Aug. 24. MISR, flying onboard NASA’s Terra satellite, carries nine cameras that observe Earth at different angles. It takes approximately seven minutes for all the cameras to observe the same location, and the motion of the clouds during that time is used to compute the wind speed at the cloudtops. This image shows Hurricane Lane as observed by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite on Thursday, August 22.

 

August 19, 2018
ARIA Damage Proxy Map (DPM) comparing JAXA ALOS-2 SAR data from May 13, 2018  vs. August 19, 2018.
ARIA Damage Proxy Map (DPM) comparing JAXA ALOS-2 SAR data from May 13, 2018  vs. August 19, 2018. The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and Caltech, also in Pasadena, created this Damage Proxy Map (DPM) depicting areas in the northeastern part of Lombok Island, Indonesia, that are likely damaged (shown by red and yellow pixels) as a result of the major earthquake sequence (including the M6.4 July 29, the M6.9 August 5, the M5.9 August 9, and the M6.4 August 18 earthquakes) in 2018. The map is derived from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images from the ALOS-2 satellites, operated by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The images were taken before (May 13, 2018 00:30) and after (August 19, 2018 00:30, both local time) the earthquakes. The map covers an area of 73 by 70 kilometers, shown by the large red polygon. Each pixel measures about 30 meters across. The color variation from yellow to red indicates increasingly more significant ground surface change. Preliminary validation was done by comparing with the DigitalGlobe's high-resolution optical satellite imagery. This damage proxy map should be used as guidance to identify damaged areas, and may be less reliable over vegetated areas. For example, the scattered single colored pixels over vegetated areas may be false positives, and the lack of colored pixels over vegetated areas does not necessarily mean no damage.

 

August 24, 2018
SERVIR Global Logo
NASA and the Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre hosted a joint workshop to explore new ways to link disaster risk reduction, preparedness, and response with NASA’s Earth Observation (EO) capabilities. Convened at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama beginning August 21, this four-day event improved the ability of NASA EO scientists and coordinators to understand and address the needs of on-the-ground stakeholders. The workshop also helped to facilitate improved communication and partnership between the NASA Disasters program and SERVIR to design and implement future collaborations.

 

August 23, 2018
GPM Core Observatory overpass of Hurricane Lane from Aug. 23rd, 2018 at 6:21am HST (local time).
GPM Core Observatory overpass of Hurricane Lane from Aug. 23rd, 2018 at 6:21am HST (local time).

 

August 23, 2018
Sea surface temperatures in the tropical Pacific Ocean on August 21, 2018 compiled by Coral Reef Watch, which blends observations from the Suomi NPP, MTSAT, Meteosat, and GOES satellites, and computer models. 
Multiple threatening tropical cyclones spun over the Pacific Ocean in August 2018. In the northwest Pacific basin, typhoons Soulik and Cimaron took aim at Japan and the Korean Peninsula. Then Hurricane Lane lined up in the tropical Pacific for an encounter with the Hawaiian Islands. At 10:45 a.m. Hawaii Standard Time (20:45 Universal Time) on August 21, 2018, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired this natural-color image of Hurricane Lane. Around that time, Lane was a powerful category 4 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 250 kilometers (155 miles) per hour. The storm’s center was 925 kilometers (575 miles) south-southeast of Honolulu. By that evening, Lane intensified to a category 5 storm.

 

August 9, 2018
False color RGB images of the Mendecino Complex fires from the ER-2 MASTER sensor, collected on 8/9/18. 
False color RGB image of the Mendocino Complex fires from ER-2's MASTER sensor, collected on 8/9/18.  The ER-2 aircraft carrying the MASTER (the NASA MODIS/ASTER) sensor flew over Mendocino Complex Fires on August 9, 2018. The sensor captured images of both fires in the area with the Ranch Fire on the north side of Clear Lake and the River Fire on the south side. The products are false color RGB composites, which allow for the identification of various features within the fire, which can be obscured by the smoke produced by the fires. False color RGB image of the Donnell fires from ER-2's MASTER sensor, collected on 8/9/18. 

 

August 7, 2018
Satellite-Derived Map of Ground Deformation from Earthquake beneath Lombok, Indonesia
Scientists with the Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis project (ARIA), a collaboration between NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and Caltech, also in Pasadena, using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data from the European Union’s Copernicus Sentinel-1A and -1B satellites, operated by the European Space Agency, generated a map of the deformation of Earth’s surface caused by the Aug. 5, 2018 magnitude 6.9 earthquake under Lombok island, Indonesia. The deformation map is produced from automated interferometric processing of the SAR data using the JPL-Caltech ARIA data system in response to a signal received from the U.S. Geological Survey. The false-color map shows the amount of permanent surface movement that occurred almost entirely due to the quake, as viewed by the satellite, during a 6-day interval between two Sentinel-1 images acquired on July 30 and Aug. 5, 2018.  The map shows that the earthquake fault was under the northwest corner of Lombok island, probably extending offshore to the west. Through these maps, NASA and its partners are contributing important observations and expertise that can assist with response to earthquakes and other natural or human-produced hazards.  From the pattern of deformation in the map, scientists have determined that the earthquake fault slip was on a fault beneath the northwestern part of Lombok Island and caused as much as 10 inches (25 centimeters) of uplift of the ground surface. The map depicts motion towards the satellite (up and west) in the direction of the radar’s line-of-sight, with contours every 2 inches (5 centimeters). White areas are places where the radar measurement was not possible, largely due to dense forests in the middle of the islands.

 

August 7, 2018
Fig. 2: Both GNSS and teleseismic waves (black) are used to model (red) the earthquake.
Earthquake epicenter (red star) and teleseismic stations (black triangles). Fig. 2: Both GNSS and teleseismic waves (black) are used to model (red) the earthquake.

 

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