MISR Aerosol Plume Height Measurements from the Kilauea Volcano Eruption

May 6, 2018
June 25, 2018

MISR Aerosol Plume Height Measurements from the Kilauea Volcano Eruption

June 23rd, 2018

MISR highlights June 23rd 2018

Volcanic eruptions can generate significant amounts of atmospheric aerosols that often have regional to global impacts. To determine the influence of volcanic eruptions, accurate plume heights are needed, but are difficult to obtain  due to the hazardous nature of such eruptions. Stereo images from NASA’s Multi-Angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) make it possible to map plume heights in ongoing eruptions using parallax in the stereo imagery. We can also distinguish eruptive plumes from metrological clouds and remobilized ash with these data. 

Kilauea volcano, Hawaii in the central Pacific, began displaying heightened activity on April 17, 2018. On June 23, 2018 MISR observed a plume generated in the Leilani Estates Rift region dispersing southwest around the south of the island. The plume initially injected to an altitude of ~2.5 km descending to a downwind dispersion altitude of ~1 km. A primary plume displays consistent southwest dispersion. However, a diffuse aerosol plume persists immediately west of the island. The visual characteristics of the plume indicate little or no ash components. Activity remains high at Kilauea currently, with the potential for ongoing eruptions causing significant regional hazards to populations and aviation. 

June 23rd MISR highlights

The plume is visible to the west-southwest of Hawaii (Fig. A), and is comprised of smaller particles than those identified in background regions (denoted by a higher Angstrom Exponent: Fig B). 

The plume shows no evidence of non-spherical particles (Fig. C) or light-absorbing (dark) particles (Fig. D) that would be present if the plume were dominated by  ash components. 

The output of the MISR Research Aerosol (RA) retrieval algorithm indicates a plume of small, spherical, non-absorbing particles characteristic of  a sulfate/water-rich plume, likely produced by the oxidation of emitted volcanic sulfur dioxide (SO2).  This result is similar to retrievals from previous plumes in this eruption cycle.

 

June 21st, 2018

June 21st MISR highlights

Volcanic eruptions can generate significant amounts of atmospheric aerosols that often have regional to global impacts. To determine the influence of volcanic eruptions, accurate plume heights are needed, but are difficult to obtain  due to the hazardous nature of such eruptions. Stereo images from NASA’s Multi-Angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) make it possible to map plume heights in ongoing eruptions using parallax in the stereo imagery. We can also distinguish eruptive plumes from metrological clouds and remobilized ash with these data. 

Kilauea volcano, Hawaii in the central Pacific, began displaying heightened activity on April 17, 2018. On June 21, 2018 MISR observed a large diffuse plume downwind from the Island. We obtain few height retrievals due to the thin, featureless nature of the plume, but results show the plume is confined below an altitude of ~2 km. The plume was transported to the west and remains below the altitude of local meteorological cloud cover. Visible properties  of the plume indicate little or no ash components. Activity remains high at Kilauea currently, with the potential for ongoing eruptions causing significant regional hazards to populations and aviation. 

June 21st MISR highlights

The plume is visible among significant meteorological cloud cover (Fig. A),  Despite showing few contrast features used for MISR stereo plume-height geometric retrievals, the MISR radiance-based particle-type retrievals for the plume are quite robust.

This plume contains smaller particles than those of the background regions (indicated by higher Angstrom Exponent; Fig B). 

The plume shows no evidence of non-spherical particles (Fig. C) or light-absorbing (dark) particles (Fig. D) that would be present if the plume were dominated by  ash components. 

The output of the MISR Research Aerosol (RA) retrieval algorithm indicates a plume of small, spherical, non-absorbing particles characteristic of  a sulfate/water-rich plume, likely produced by the oxidation of emitted volcanic sulfur dioxide (SO2).  This result is similar to retrievals from previous plumes in this eruption cycle.

 

June 14th, 2018

MISR highlights from June 14 2018

Volcanic eruptions can generate significant amounts of atmospheric aerosols that often have regional to global impacts. To determine the influence of volcanic eruptions, accurate plume heights are needed, but are difficult to obtain  due to the hazardous nature of such eruptions. Stereo images from NASA’s Multi-Angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) make it possible to map plume heights in ongoing eruptions using parallax in the stereo imagery. We can also distinguish eruptive plumes from metrological clouds and remobilized ash with these data. 

Kilauea volcano, Hawaii in the central Pacific, began displaying heightened activity on April 17, 2018. On June 14, 2018 the summit and rift zones were obscured by meteorological cloud cover. However, MISR observed a plume downwind from the Island, reaching ~1-3 km above the ocean surface. The plume was transported to the west and is confined below the altitude of local meteorological cloud cover. The visual characteristics of the plume indicate little or no ash components. Activity remains high at Kilauea currently, with the potential for ongoing eruptions causing significant regional hazards to populations and aviation. 

 

MISR highlights from June 14 2018

The plume is visible among significant meteorological cloud cover (Fig. A), and is comprised of smaller particles than those identified in background regions (denoted by a higher Angstrom Exponent: Fig B). 

The plume shows no evidence of non-spherical particles (Fig. C) or light-absorbing (dark) particles (Fig. D) that would be present if the plume were dominated by  ash components. 

The output of the MISR Research Aerosol (RA) retrieval algorithm indicates a plume of small, spherical, non-absorbing particles characteristic of  a sulfate/water-rich plume, likely produced by the oxidation of emitted volcanic sulfur dioxide (SO2).  This result is similar to retrievals from previous plumes in this eruption cycle.

 

June 7th, 2018:

MISR highlights June 7th

Volcanic eruptions can generate significant amounts of atmospheric aerosols that can have regional to global impacts. To determine volcanic plume impacts with computer models, accurate plume heights are needed, but are difficult to obtain  due to the hazardous nature of such eruptions. Stereo images from NASA’s Multi-Angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) make it possible to map plume heights in ongoing eruptions using parallax in the stereo imagery. Multi-angle images make it possible to distinguish eruptive plumes from metrological clouds and remobilized ash. 

Kilauea volcano, Hawaii in the central Pacific, began displaying heightened activity on April 17, 2018. On June 7, 2018 MISR observed a near source plume reaching ~4 km above sea level. The plume was transported inland, west across the island, from the Leilani Estate Rift area. The plume displays uplift corresponding to terrain changes but also suggests turbulent mixing at 2-4 km as dispersion occurs. It is likely that the turbulence in this plume could help the volcanic aerosols descend to lower altitude. Serious health impacts to local populations are likely should these transport dynamics persist. The visual characteristics of the plume indicate little or no ash components. At 3 - 4 km altitude, the direct (ash fall) and indirect (surface temperature) effects are likely to remain local-regional. 

A diffuse plume is evident for at least 1200 km downwind, which is the full extent of the MODIS swath. 

The MISR plume-height retrieval indicates that the particles descend from ~3 - 4 km near-source to ~1 - 1.5 km with further westward transport over the ocean.  

The suspension altitude of the downwind plume is consistent with previously analyzed Kilauea plumes. Lateral plume-spreading is evident along with the downwind dispersion.

MISR highlights June 7th

The plume is visible to the west of Hawaii (Fig. A). It is comprised of smaller particles than those identified in background regions (indicated by a higher Angstrom Exponent; Fig B). 

The plume shows no evidence of non-spherical particles (Fig. C) or light-absorbing (dark) particles (Fig. D) that would be present if the plume were dominated by  ash components. 

The output of the MISR Research Aerosol (RA) retrieval algorithm indicates a plume of small, spherical, non-absorbing particles characteristic of  sulfate/water-rich plume particles. 

The plume properties appear consistent with previous retrievals from this eruption sequence.

 

May 22nd, 2018:

MISR Plume height measurements

Volcanic eruptions can generate significant amounts of atmospheric aerosols that can have regional to global impacts. To determine the influence of volcanic eruptions, accurate plume heights are needed, but are difficult to obtain  due to the hazardous nature of such eruptions. Stereo images from NASA’s Multi-Angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) make it possible to map plume heights in ongoing eruptions using parallax in the stereo imagery. Multi-angle images make it possible to distinguish eruptive plumes from metrological clouds and remobilized ash. 

Kilauea volcano, Hawaii in the central Pacific, began displaying heightened activity on April 17, 2018. On May 22, 2018 MISR observed a plume reaching ~1 km above the ocean surface. The plume appears well contained within the lower troposphere. The plume was transported to the southwest parallel to the coastline, before shifting west as it moved past the southernmost point of the island. The visual characteristics of the plume indicate little or no ash components. At this altitude, the direct (ash fall) and indirect (surface temperature) effects are likely to remain local-regional. Activity remains high at Kilauea on subsequent days, with the potential for ongoing eruptions to cause significant regional hazards to populations and aviation. 

MISR Plume height measurements

The diffuse plume region displays a similar suspension altitude to the core plume. Lateral spreading of the plume is evident to the west of the island.

A small summit plume is present at the Kilauea summit. This plume is suspended ~1 km above the terrain. This plume does not extend over the ocean.

MISR Plume height measurements

The plume is visible among significant meteorological cloud cover (Fig. A). The plume is comprised of smaller particles than those identified in background regions (denoted by a higher Angstrom Exponent: Fig B). 

The plume indicates no evidence of non-spherical particles (Fig. C) or light-absorbing (dark) particles (Fig. D) that would be present if the plume were dominated by  ash components. 

The output of the MISR Research Aerosol (RA) retrieval algorithm indicates a plume of small, spherical, non-absorbing particles characteristic of  a sulfate/water-rich plume particles, likely produced by the oxidation of emitted volcanic sulfur dioxide (SO2)

 

May 6th, 2018:

MISR Active Plume Measurements from the Kilauea Volcano Eruption

Volcanic eruptions can generate significant amounts of atmospheric aerosols that can have regional to global impacts. To determine the influence of volcanic eruptions, accurate plume heights are needed, but are difficult to obtain  due to the hazardous nature of such eruptions. Stereo images from NASA’s Multi-Angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) make it possible to map plume heights in ongoing eruptions using parallax in the stereo imagery. Multi-angle images make it possible to distinguish eruptive plumes from metrological clouds and remobilized ash.    

Kilauea volcano, Hawaii in the central Pacific, began displaying heightened activity on 30 August 2017. On May 6, 2018 MISR observed a plume reaching ~1.5 km above the ocean surface. The plume appears diffuse  and well contained within the lower troposphere. The plume was transported to the southwest parallel to the coastline, before shifting as it moved past the southernmost point of the island. The visual characteristics of the plume indicate little or no ash components. At this altitude, the direct (ash fall) and indirect (surface temperature) effects are likely to remain local-regional. Activity remains high at Kilauea on subsequent days, with the potential for ongoing eruptions to cause significant regional hazards to populations and aviation. MI

  Volcanic eruption plume from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii MISR Active Aerosol Plume-Height (AAP) Project 6 May 2018

The plume is visible among significant meteorological cloud cover (purple: Fig. A). The plume is comprised of smaller particles than those identified in background regions (denoted by a higher Angstrom Exponent: Fig B). 

The plume indicates no evidence of non-spherical particles (Fig. C) or light-absorbing (dark) particles (Fig. D) that would be present if the plume were dominated by  ash components. 

The output of the MISR Research Aerosol (RA) retrieval algorithm indicates a plume of small, spherical, non-absorbing particles characteristic of  a sulfate/water-rich plume particles, likely produced by the oxidation of emitted volcanic sulfur dioxide (SO2): https://so2.gsfc.nasa.gov/pix/daily/0518/hawaii_0518p.html