Hurricane Florence 2018

Start Date

September 7, 2018

Overview

UPDATE 9/17/18:  Remnants of Hurricane Florence are now a post-tropical cyclone moving over the Mid-Atlantic states.  To date the storm has caused approximately 25 deaths.  Tens of thousands of homes in the Southeast, including the Carolinas have been damaged as floodwaters continue to rise, and numerous communities, including the City of Wilmington, NC are cut off by the floodwaters.  Search and rescue operations are continuing, and thousands of people remain in shelters.  NASA Scientists have begun to map the floodwaters by aircraft using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) which has the ability to see through clouds to more concisely map the floodwaters and aid first responders as well as in the recovery effort.

UPDATE 9/14/18: Hurricane Florence made landfall at 7:15 AM EDT near Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina as a Category 1 hurricane with estimated maximum winds of 90 mph. As of 5 PM EDT, Florence is now a tropical storm with estimated maximum winds of 70 mph and is located near the North Carolina-South Carolina border. It is forecasted to move across South Carolina and weaken into a tropical depression by Sunday. NASA Earth Science is bringing all relevant observations and science expertise to bear on Hurricane Florence before, during, and after landfall to provide situational awareness to stakeholders and the public. The intent is to provide a more comprehensive awareness throughout the entire disaster life cycle.

Photograph of Hurricane Florence as seen from the International Space Station on 9/12/2018 at ~600 miles from Southeast U.S. coastline.

Photograph of Hurricane Florence as seen from the International Space Station on 9/12/2018 at ~600 miles from Southeast U.S. coastline.

UPDATE 9/12/18: With Category 4 Hurricane Florence less than 48 hours from making landfall on the Southeast Coast, the NASA Disasters program has been hard at work identifying geographically referenced science information products for response partners like FEMA, the National Guard, USGS and more. The Disasters team has been providing a variety of satellite and airborne remote sensing capabilities to aid storm preparedness, response, and recovery efforts. As flooding is one of the primary threats during this event, much of what the Disasters program will be providing will be related to information on flooding. Hurricane Florence could be the strongest storm to target the Carolinas in decades, FEMA officials have said. 

Latest Updates

September 14, 2018
 AMSR-2 / GCOM-1 Surface Precipitation Rates from Hurricane Florence obtained 9/14/18
 AMSR-2 / GCOM-1 Surface Precipitation Rates from Hurricane Florence obtained 9/14/18 The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) instrument on the Global Change Observation Mission - Water 1 (GCOM-W1) provides global passive microwave measurements of terrestrial, oceanic, and atmospheric parameters for the investigation of global water and energy cycles. Near real-time (NRT) products are generated within 3 hours of the last observations in the file, by the Land Atmosphere Near...
September 14, 2018
The map shown here was generated using sea surface height measurements from the first 10 days (February 12-20, 2015) of data collected once Jason-3 reached its operational orbit of 830 miles (1336 kilometers).
 Jason-3 is the fourth mission in U.S.-European series of satellite missions that measure the height of the ocean surface. Launched on January 17, 2016, the mission will extend the time series of ocean surface topography measurements (the hills and valleys of the ocean surface) begun by the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite mission in 1992 and continuing through the Jason-1 (launched in 2001) and the currently operating OSTM/Jason-2 (launched in 2008) missions. These measurements provide scientists with critical information about circulation patterns in the ocean and about both global and...
September 14, 2018
ISS LIS near-realtime 12 Hour browse image from 9/14/18at  22:41 UTC
The Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), is a space-based instrument used to detect the distribution and variability of total lightning (cloud-to-cloud, intra-cloud, and cloud-to-ground lightning). It measures the amount, rate, and radiant energy of lightning during both day and night. Two LIS instruments were built in the 1990s, one for the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) and a spare which was stored on a shelf for over 20 years. ...
September 14, 2018
This natural-color image shows how Hurricane Florence appeared from above to the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite on September 11, 2018. The second image, acquired by CloudSat on the same day, shows a cross-secti
This natural-color image shows how Hurricane Florence appeared from above to the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite on September 11, 2018. The second image, acquired by CloudSat on the same day, shows a cross-section—how the storm would look if it had been sliced near the middle and viewed from the side.  In April 2006, a Boeing Delta II rocket launched CloudSat, along with a...
September 14, 2018
NASA's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) passed over Hurricane Florence as it approached the eastern coast of the United States on Thursday, September 13, 2018.
The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument will provide a unique opportunity for studying the ecology and climate of Earth through the acquisition of global multiangle imagery on the daylit side of Earth. MISR views Earth with cameras pointed in 9 different directions. As the instrument flies overhead, each piece of Earth's surface below is successively imaged by all 9 cameras, in each of 4 wavelengths (blue, green, red, and near-infrared). NASA's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (...
September 14, 2018
Photograph of Hurricane Florence as seen from the International Space Station on 9/12/2018 at ~600 miles from Southeast U.S. coastline.
Photograph of Hurricane Florence as seen from the International Space Station on 9/12/2018 at ~600 miles from Southeast U.S. coastline. Astronauts onboard the International Space Station are using digital cameras to take images of Hurricane Florence as they pass over it, capturing panoramic views of the storm’s eye and cloud bands.  Once the storm has passed and cloud cover lessens, requests to document flooding, changes to the land surface, etc. will be sent to the crew as part of...
September 14, 2018
This image, taken at 1:35 pm local time on Tuesday, September 11, 2018 by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) onboard NASA's Aqua satellite shows Hurricane Florence whose strong winds are expected to reach the Carolina coast late Thursday. Florence in
The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, AIRS, is a facility instrument whose goal is to support climate research and improve weather forecasting. Launched into Earth orbit on May 4, 2002 aboard NASA's Aqua satellite, AIRS moves climate research and weather prediction into the 21st century. AIRS is one of six instruments onboard Aqua, which is part of NASA's Earth Observing System of satellites.  This image, taken at 1:35 pm local time on Tuesday, September 11, 2018 by the Atmospheric Infrared...
September 10, 2018
GPM Core Observatory overpass of Hurricane Florence from September 7, 2018.
Video of GPM Observes Tropical Storm Florence Temporarily Weakened by Wind Shear   GPM passed over Tropical Storm Florence on September 7, 2018. As the camera moves in on the storm, DPR's volumetric view of the storm is revealed. A slicing plane moves across the volume to display precipitation rates throughout the storm. Shades of green to red represent liquid precipitation. Frozen precipitation is shown in cyan and purple. NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite flew over Tropical Storm Florence on September 7, 2018. At that time, the...

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