Hurricane Dorian 2019

Start Date

August 24, 2019

Overview

Dorian formed as a tropical depression on Saturday, Aug. 24 about 805 miles (1,300 km) east-southeast of Barbados. By 5 p.m. EDT that day, the depression strengthened into a tropical storm and was named Dorian.

On Wednesday, August 28, 2019, the National Hurricane Center or NHC noted that a Hurricane Watch is in effect for Puerto Rico, Vieques, Culebra, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for the British Virgin Islands and the Dominican Republic from Isla Saona to Samana.

On Aug. 27 at 1:35 p.m. EDT (1735 UTC) the MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua provided a visible look at Tropical Storm Dorian as it moved over the Leeward Islands. Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS)

On Aug. 27 at 1:35 p.m. EDT (1735 UTC) the MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua provided a visible look at Tropical Storm Dorian as it moved over the Leeward Islands. Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS)

The Disasters Program has activated with the initial expectation for a Tier I level of effort, and is working with stakeholders from FEMA, the Puerto Rico Science, Technology and Research Trust, and the National Meteorological Office of the Dominican Republic. Anticipated and potentially available products thus far include ARIA Flood Proxy Maps, ARIA Damage Proxy Maps, SPoRT Day/Night Band, SPoRT Land Information System Data, Landslide Nowcast, Water Extent Maps, and GPM Accumulation Data.

Disaster Types

Latest Updates

September 6, 2019
Screenshot of SAR flood map from Hurricane Dorian on 9/2/19.
Powerful Category 5 Hurricane Dorian struck the northern parts of the Bahamas on Sunday, September 1. Dorian first pummeled the Abaco Islands before stalling and battering Grand Bahama Island more than 40 hours with heavy rain and catastrophic storm surge. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) GOES East satellite provided rapid, highly detailed imaging so that forecasters would have critical information about the storm’s movement. In the evening hours of September 2, the European Space Agency’s Sentinel-1A satellite also passed over the Bahamas, with a synthetic...
September 6, 2019
The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi NPP satellite captured this nighttime composite image as the storm approached the coast at 3:42 a.m. Eastern Time (07:42 UTC) on September 5, 2019.  Credit: NASA Earth Observatory
The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi NPP satellite captured this nighttime composite image as the storm approached the coast at 3:42 a.m. Eastern Time (07:42 UTC) on September 5, 2019.  Credit: NASA Earth Observatory After devastating the Bahamas and grazing Florida and Georgia, Hurricane Dorian rebounded and raked the coast of South Carolina with strong winds, heavy rains, and a storm surge. Wind, falling trees, and flooding damaged power infrastructure...
September 5, 2019
A damage assessment map derived from satellite data shows conditions on one island in the Bahamas on Sept. 2. Red and yellow areas are likely the most damaged. Credit: NASA-JPL, Caltech, Earth Observatory of Singapore. 
A damage assessment map derived from satellite data shows conditions on one island in the Bahamas on Sept. 2. Red and yellow areas are likely the most damaged. Credit: NASA-JPL, Caltech, Earth Observatory of Singapore. Copyright contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2019), processed by ESA Versión en español NASA has created and provided to emergency response...
August 29, 2019
GPM IMERG estimated rainfall totals for Hurricane Dorian from August 31st - September 5th, 2019. Credit: Owen Kelley (NASA GSFC)
UPDATE 9/5/19: Hurricane Dorian continues to generate tremendous amounts of rainfall, and has left over three feet of rain in some areas of the Bahamas and is now lashing the Carolinas. NASA’s IMERG product provided a look at those rainfall totals.
September 4, 2019
GPM overpass of Hurricane Dorian
Video of GPM Satellite observes Hurricane Dorian over the Bahamas   The NASA / JAXA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory flew over Hurricane Dorian on September 1st (5:22pm ET / 21:22 UTC) as the storm was directly over Abaco Island in The Bahamas. The satellite captured data on rainfall rates within the storm as it flew over using its Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and GPM Microwave Imager (GMI). In this animation the multi-satellite GPM IMERG product is shown first to illustrate rainfall rates prior to the overpass. When the camera zooms in data...
September 4, 2019
Screenshot of TEMPEST-D Dorian data.
A new view of Hurricane Dorian shows the layers of the storm, as seen by an experimental NASA weather satellite that's the size of a cereal box. TEMPEST-D reveals rain bands in four layers of the storm as Hurricane Dorian approaches Florida on Sept. 3, 2019. The multiple vertical layers show where the strongest convective "storms" within the hurricane are pushing high into the atmosphere, with pink, red and yellow corresponding to the areas of heaviest rainfall.
September 3, 2019
 NASA's ARIA team used satellite data acquired on Sept. 2, 2019, to map flooding in the Bahamas in the wake of Hurricane Dorian. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech, ESA
NASA's ARIA team used satellite data acquired on Sept. 2, 2019, to map flooding in the Bahamas in the wake of Hurricane Dorian. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech, ESA While many NASA missions are tracking Hurricane Dorian as the storm makes its way toward the United States, some researchers are looking at what Dorian has already left behind.  The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, used synthetic aperture radar data from the...
August 30, 2019
Screenshot of SPORT-LIS soil moisture map for Florida on August 25th, 2019. 
NASA data shows that in many parts of the state the soil is already saturated with moisture - a condition that could lead to increased flooding as Hurricane Dorian heads for a potential landfall in central Florida.   Analyzing soil moisture conditions in advance of an approaching weather system helps researchers and disasters response agencies anticipate the impact of heavy rainfall and identify regions which are more likely to experience runoff and flooding. Using a land surface modeling system which incorporates near real-time satellite observations, NASA developed soil moisture...
August 30, 2019
Satellite view of Hurricane Dorian on Thursday, Aug. 29. (Credit: NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory)
As Hurricane Dorian slowly approaches Florida’s Atlantic coast, NASA personnel have engaged with federal, state and local emergency responders in preparation for landfall as soon as Labor Day. A team of NASA disaster coordinators from the Earth Science Division’s Disasters Program has been activated to work with emergency agencies to determine what NASA information assets derived from satellite data can be provided to help decision makers direct resources and help communities likely to be affected by the storm. NASA has already created a map of Florida showing current soil...