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Disaster Updates

  • The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, created this Flood Proxy Map depicting areas of Southeastern Texas that are likely flooded as a result of Hurricane Harvey, shown by light blue pixels. The map is...
    Flood Proxy Map depicting areas of Southeastern Texas that are likely flooded as a result of Hurricane Harvey, shown by light blue pixels.
  • ISS Georeferenced Digital Camera Images of Brumandinho Dam Area, Brazil This collection of visible-wavelength (red, green, blue or RGB) digital camera images were taken by astronauts onboard the International Space Station on February 2, 2019, then manually...
    ISS Georeferenced Digital Camera Images of Brumandinho Dam Area, Brazil
  • When disasters occur, our researchers become providers and distributors of images, data, and damage assessments. The Disasters team and network of partners and volunteers assist with hazard assessment, evaluation of severity, and identification of impacts near vulnerable infrastructure, crops, and lifelines especially in remote areas where observations are sparse to provide guidance for action.
    Photo of Hurricane Florence from the ISS
  • UAVSAR image overlaid a Googe Earth Map. The red borders are fire extent from the Woolsey Fire in California.  NASA deployed a research aircraft on Nov. 15 for a nighttime flight over the California Woolsey Fire. The NASA C-20 aircraft carried sensors to map the fire scar, with a goal...
    UAVSAR image overlaid a Googe Earth Map. Credit: Andrea Donnellan, NASA JPL, Google Earth, UAVSAR
  • The circles in Fig. 2 indicate the data uncertainty range; signals beyond the circles are meaningful.  On November 30, 2018 a magnitude 7 earthquake occurred near Anchorage, Alaska cracking buildings, damaging roads and buckling bridges. Over 4,500 structures were destroyed in the event. NASA’s...
    The circles in Fig. 2 indicate the data uncertainty range; signals beyond the circles are meaningful. 
 

About the NASA Disasters Program

The Disasters Applications area promotes the use of Earth observations to improve prediction of, preparation for, response to, and recovery from natural and technological disasters. Disaster applications and applied research on natural hazards support emergency preparedness leaders in developing mitigation approaches, such as early warning systems, and providing information and maps to disaster response and recovery teams.

 

Earth Observatory

February 13, 2019

Dusty, Smoky Skies in Australia
The dust reddened the skies over Sydney and turned air quality hazardous over parts of New South Wales.

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February 13, 2019

A Strong Start to Sierra Snowpack
A succession of storms in January and February dumped huge amounts of snow on the Sierra Nevada.

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February 11, 2019

Summer Floods in Australia
Weeks of rainfall pounded Queensland in January and February 2019, causing destructive flooding in the region.

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February 11, 2019

Fires Burn in Parched New Zealand
Wildfires near the city of Nelson burned amid a hot, dry summer.

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February 7, 2019

Drought then Deluge Turned a Stable Landslide into Disaster
“Stable landslide” sounds like a contradiction in terms, but there are indeed places on Earth where land has been creeping downhill slowly and harmlessly for as long as a century.

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Resources

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