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Disaster Updates

  • Near real-time fire emissions products from the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED) have recently been added to the NASA Disasters Mapping Portal, making it easier to for disaster researchers and responders to track aerosols and changes in greenhouse gases and air quality from fires around the world. This application from the NASA Disasters...
    Screenshot of the GFED product in the NASA Disasters Mapping portal
  • The Washington Post contacted NASA researcher and NASA Disasters Program Center Coordinator Jean-Paul Vernier for his insights into a paper on the 2020 Australia fires, published in Geophysical Research Letters. The article is titled "Australia’s...
    Pyrocumulus clouds forming from the bushfires in Australia as seen by the JMA Himawari-8 satellite. Credit: Satellite data from JMA Himawari 8 processed by NOAA, CIRA
  • The powerful hurricane that struck Galveston, Texas on September 8, 1900, killing an estimated 8,000 people and destroying more than 3,600 buildings, took the coastal city by surprise.  This video looks at advances in hurricane forecasting in the 120 years since, with a focus on the contributions from weather satellites. This satellite technology has allowed us to track hurricanes – their...
    Satellite image of a hurricane
  • NASA’s Terra satellite provided a visible image to forecasters of Tropical Storm Nuri as it approached the southeastern coast of China on Saturday, June 13. Credit: NASA Worldview NASA’s Terra satellite provided a visible image to forecasters of Tropical Storm Nuri as it...
    NASA’s Terra satellite provided a visible image to forecasters of Tropical Storm Nuri as it approached the southeastern coast of China on Saturday, June 13. Credit: NASA Worldview
  • Scientists at NASA’s Short-Term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) project use near real-time data to help the operational weather community with hurricane forecasting. As the sun came up on September 1, 2019, the eye of Hurricane Dorian was fast approaching the Abaco Islands in the Bahamas. The Category 5 hurricane hit the islands at 12:40 p.m. local time with maximum sustained winds of...
    Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-East (GOES-East) imagery shows Hurricane Dorian making landfall on September 1, 2019. Image courtesy of NASA Worldview.
 

About the NASA Disasters Program

The Disasters Applications area promotes the use of Earth observations to improve prediction of, preparation for, response to, and recovery from natural and technological disasters. Disaster applications and applied research on natural hazards support emergency preparedness leaders in developing mitigation approaches, such as early warning systems, and providing information and maps to disaster response and recovery teams.

 

Earth Observatory

June 29, 2020

A Dust Plume to Remember
While dust routinely blows across the Atlantic Ocean, scientists rarely see plumes as large and dense with particles as the one that darkened Caribbean skies in June 2020.

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June 26, 2020

Channeling a Bloom
Unusually clear skies and persistent, unseasonable heat may have set the stage for a large and persistent blooms of phytoplankton in the waters around England.

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June 25, 2020

Signs of Drought in European Groundwater
Long-term rainfall deficits, heat waves, and increased evaporation have depleted some of the groundwater supply beneath central and eastern Europe.

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June 23, 2020

Heat and Fire Scorches Siberia
Fires are raging in eastern Siberia in the midst of an unusually long-lived heat wave.

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June 23, 2020

An Astronaut’s View of an Annular Eclipse
An astronaut aboard the International Space Station shot a photograph of the Moon’s shadow crossing the Earth on June 21, 2020.

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